Robert Horne Charles

M, b. 14 September 1913, d. 25 October 2000
     Robert Horne Charles was born on 14 September 1913 in St. Louis, Missouri.1 He was the son of Benjamin H. Charles and Nancy M. Horne.2,1 Robert Horne Charles graduated in 1935 from Yale and in 1938 from Yale Law School.2 He married Elizabeth Olive Sewall, daughter of William H. Evans and Helen Ellena Embach, on 9 July 1938 in Grace Episcopal Church, Bath, Maine.3 Robert Horne Charles died on 25 October 2000 in Newport, Rhode Island, at the age of 87.4,5

He was vice president of the McDonnell Aircraft Corporation in St. Louis and Assistant Secretary of the Air Force in the Kennedy and Johnson Administrations.6

Citations

  1. [S232] Ancestry.com, Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007.
  2. [S160] New York Times, 26 Nov 1937 p. 28.
  3. [S205] Newspaper, The Lewiston Daily Sun, July 8, 1938.
  4. [S210] Social Security Death Index.
  5. [S392] Website findagrave.com (http://www.findagrave.com/) "# 45633421."
  6. [S160] New York Times, 16 October 1983.

Alan de Charlton1

M, d. 3 December 1360
     Alan de Charlton married Elena la Zouche, daughter of Alan la Zouche, of Ashby Lord Zouche and Eleanor de Seagrave.1 Alan de Charlton died on 3 December 1360.1

Child of Alan de Charlton and Elena la Zouche

Citations

  1. [S175] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots, p. 39.

Sir Alan de Charlton1

M, b. circa 1318, d. 3 May 1349
     Sir Alan de Charlton was born circa 1318.2 He was the son of Alan de Charlton and Elena la Zouche.2 Sir Alan de Charlton married Margery Fitz Aer, daughter of Thomas Fitz Aer, before 1338.1 Sir Alan de Charlton died on 3 May 1349.2

Child of Sir Alan de Charlton and Margery Fitz Aer

Citations

  1. [S288] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta ancestry, p. 178.
  2. [S175] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots, p. 39.

Anna de Charlton1

F, b. before 1380, d. before 1399
     Anna de Charlton was born before 1380.1 She was the daughter of Thomas de Charlton.1 Anna de Charlton married William de Knightly.1 Anna de Charlton died before 1399.1

Child of Anna de Charlton and William de Knightly

Citations

  1. [S175] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots, p. 39.

Anne Charlton1

F, b. circa 1480
     Anne Charlton was born circa 1480.1 She was the daughter of Richard Charlton and Elizabeth Mainwaring.1 Anne Charlton married Randall Grosvenor, son of Randall Grosvenor of Bellaport and Margaret Mainwaring, circa 1500.2

Child of Anne Charlton and Randall Grosvenor

Citations

  1. [S175] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots, p. 39.
  2. [S288] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta ancestry, p. 146.

Richard Charlton1

M, b. 1450, d. 1522
     Richard Charlton was born in 1450.1 He was the son of Robert Charlton (alias Knightley) and Mary Corbet.1 Richard Charlton married Elizabeth Mainwaring, daughter of William Mainwaring and Margaret Warren, say 1468.2 Richard Charlton died in 1522.1

Child of Richard Charlton and Elizabeth Mainwaring

Citations

  1. [S175] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots, p. 39.
  2. [S288] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta ancestry, p. 178.

Robert Charlton (alias Knightley)1

M, b. before 1430, d. 1471
     Robert Charlton (alias Knightley) was born before 1430.1 He was the son of Thomas Charlton (alias Knightley) and Cecily Fraunceys.1 Robert Charlton (alias Knightley) married Mary Corbet, daughter of Robert Corbet.1 Robert Charlton (alias Knightley) died in 1471.1,2

Child of Robert Charlton (alias Knightley) and Mary Corbet

Citations

  1. [S175] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots, p. 39.
  2. [S288] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta ancestry, p. 178.

Thomas de Charlton1

M, b. say 1345, d. 6 October 1387
     Thomas de Charlton was born say 1345.2 He was the son of Sir Alan de Charlton and Margery Fitz Aer.1 Thomas de Charlton died on 6 October 1387.1

Child of Thomas de Charlton

Citations

  1. [S175] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots, p. 39.
  2. [S288] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta ancestry, p. 178.

Thomas Charlton (alias Knightley)1

M, b. 30 March 1394, d. 4 January 1460
     Thomas Charlton (alias Knightley) was born on 30 March 1394.2 He was the son of William de Knightly and Anna de Charlton.2 Thomas Charlton (alias Knightley) married Cecily Fraunceys.2 Thomas Charlton (alias Knightley) died on 4 January 1460 at the age of 65.2

Child of Thomas Charlton (alias Knightley) and Cecily Fraunceys

Citations

  1. [S288] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta ancestry, p. 178.
  2. [S175] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots, p. 39.

William Charteris of Kinfauns1

M
     William Charteris of Kinfauns married Christian Erskine, daughter of Robert Erskine, Lord Erskine (later) Earl of Mar and Elizabeth Lindsay, in 1476.1

Citations

  1. [S122] Frederick Lewis Weis, The Magna Charta Sureties, p. 59.

Clarissa Jane Chase1

F
     Clarissa Jane Chase married Asa McFarland, son of Rev. Asa McFarland and Elizabeth Kneeland, on 2 November 1830.1

Citations

  1. [S234] Ellery Bicknell Crane, Descendants of Daniel McFarland, p. 24.

John Kirby Chase1

M, b. 7 September 1813, d. 5 March 1879
     John Kirby Chase was born on 7 September 1813 in West Newbury, Massachusetts.2 He was the son of Robert Chase and Martha Jane Noyes.1 John Kirby Chase married Adelaide Ann Titcomb, daughter of Lieut. Pierson Titcomb and Anne Maria de Les Dernier, in 1840.2 John Kirby Chase died on 5 March 1879 in Lowell, Massachusetts, at the age of 65.2

Citations

  1. [S24] Sarah Elizabeth Titcomb, Early New England People, p.158.
  2. [S24] Sarah Elizabeth Titcomb, Early New England People, p. 287.

Joseph Chase1

M, b. 1754, d. 1797
     Joseph Chase was born in 1754.1 He married Olive Woodman, daughter of Nathan Woodman and Olive Gray, in 1776.1 Joseph Chase died in 1797.1

Child of Joseph Chase and Olive Woodman

Citations

  1. [S189] Frederick A. Virkus, Abridged Compendium of American Genealogy, Vol. 6 p. 517.

Lucy B. Chase1

F
     Lucy B. Chase married Otis Sewall Merrick, son of Barnabas Palmer Merrick and Deborah Sewall.1

Child of Lucy B. Chase and Otis Sewall Merrick

Citations

  1. [S89] Family Search, Massachusetts Deaths and Burials, 1795-1910.

Martha Chase1

F, d. before 1741
     Martha Chase married Stephen Gerrish, son of Colonel Joseph Gerrish and Mary Little, on 21 July 1738 in Merrimack County, New Hampshire.1 Martha Chase died before 1741.

Citations

  1. [S4] Sandra MacLean Clunies, Clunies files.

Martha Tappan Chase1

F
     Martha Tappan Chase married William Johnson.1

Child of Martha Tappan Chase and William Johnson

Citations

  1. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.

Mary Chase1

F, b. 1779, d. 1861
     Mary Chase was born in 1779.1 She was the daughter of Joseph Chase and Olive Woodman.1 Mary Chase married Benjamin Small in 1795.1 Mary Chase died in 1861.1

Child of Mary Chase and Benjamin Small

Citations

  1. [S189] Frederick A. Virkus, Abridged Compendium of American Genealogy, Vol. 6 p. 517.

Robert Chase1

M
     Robert Chase married Martha Jane Noyes.1

Child of Robert Chase and Martha Jane Noyes

Citations

  1. [S24] Sarah Elizabeth Titcomb, Early New England People, p.158.

Sarah J. Chatterson1

F
     Sarah J. Chatterson married R.L. Howe.

Child of Sarah J. Chatterson and R.L. Howe

Citations

  1. [S232] Ancestry.com, Menands, New York, Albany Rural Cemetery Burial Cards, 1791-2011.

Helen Susan Chatterton1

F, b. 3 January 1806
     Helen Susan Chatterton was born on 3 January 1806 in Winchester, Hampshire.2 She married firstly Capt. John Charles Symonds R.N., son of Capt. Thomas Symonds RN and Elizabeth Malet, on 28 October 1831 in Milford, Hampshire.1

Citations

  1. [S89] Family Search, England Marriages, 1538–1973.
  2. [S89] Family Search, England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975.

Geoffrey Chaucer

M, b. between 1340 and 1345, d. 25 October 1400
     Geoffrey Chaucer was born between 1340 and 1345. He married Phillipa Roët, daughter of Sir Paon de Roët,, in 1364. Geoffrey Chaucer died on 25 October 1400.

Catherine Chauncey

F, b. 12 January 1675, d. 15 May 1754
     Catherine Chauncey was born on 12 January 1675. She married Rev. Daniel Brewer, son of Daniel Brewer Jr. and Hannah Morrill, on 29 August 1699. Catherine Chauncey died on 15 May 1754 at the age of 79.

Child of Catherine Chauncey and Rev. Daniel Brewer

Andrew Chauncy1

M, b. 23 November 1774
     Andrew Chauncy was born on 23 November 1774.2 He was the son of Charles Chauncy and Joanna Gerrish.1

Citations

  1. [S117] The Times Newspaper, 25 April 1924.
  2. [S286] William Chauncey Fowler, Memorials of the Chaunceys, p. 47 (table).

Charles Chauncy1

M, b. 16 May 1729, d. 22 November 1809
     Charles Chauncy. Merchant.2 He was born on 16 May 1729 in Boston, Massachusetts.3 He was the son of Rev. Dr. Charles Chauncy D.D. and Elizabeth Hirst.4 Charles Chauncy graduated in 1748 from Harvard.1 He married firstly Mary Cutts on 21 May 1756.1 Charles Chauncy married secondly Joanna Gerrish on 1 July 1760 in Portsmouth, Rockingham County, New Hampshire.1,5 Charles Chauncy died on 22 November 1809 in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, at the age of 80.2

Children of Charles Chauncy and Joanna Gerrish

Child of Charles Chauncy

Child of Charles Chauncy and Mary Cutts

Citations

  1. [S83] NEHGR, Vol. 10 p. 336.
  2. [S102] Annie Haven Thwing, Inhabitants of the Town of Boston, 15088.
  3. [S232] Ancestry.com, Boston, Massachusetts, Birth Index, 1700-1800.
  4. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.
  5. [S287] Robert Chancey, "Chauncy," e-mail to unknown recipient, October 2006.
  6. [S286] William Chauncey Fowler, Memorials of the Chaunceys, p. 47 (chart).
  7. [S117] The Times Newspaper, 25 April 1924.

Charles Chauncy1

M, d. 4 May 1711
     Charles Chauncy was the son of Isaac Chauncy and Jane (Unknown).2 Charles Chauncy. Merchant.3 He married Sarah Walley, daughter of Major General John Walley and Sarah (Unknown), on 19 October 1699.1,4,3 Charles Chauncy died on 4 May 1711.3

Children of Charles Chauncy and Sarah Walley

Citations

  1. [S25] Samuel Sewall, Diary of Samuel Sewall (1973 ed.), p. 1087.
  2. [S21] Various editors, Dictionary of National Biography.
  3. [S102] Annie Haven Thwing, Inhabitants of the Town of Boston, 15086.
  4. [S102] Annie Haven Thwing, Inhabitants of the Town of Boston, 59868.
  5. [S286] William Chauncey Fowler, Memorials of the Chaunceys, p. 47 (chart).

Charles Chauncy1

M, b. 1589, d. 19 February 1671
     Charles Chauncy was born in 1589.2 He was the son of George Chauncy and Anne Welch.3,4 Charles Chauncy was christened on 5 November 1592 at Yardley-Bury, Hertfordshire.5 The emigrant ancestor of all who bear the name of Chauncy and Chauncey in the United States. He received his preparatory training at Westminster school, and entered Trinity college, Cambridge, where he was made a Bachelor of Arts in 1613, and M.A. in 1617. He was also made a fellow of the college, and in 1624 was given the degree of B.D. He was chosen professor of Hebrew, but resigned in favor of a relative of the vice-chancellor, and was appointed to the Greek professorship. He remained at Trinity for some time, and then preached for a season at Marston Laurence, Northamptonshire. In 1627 he became vicar of Ware, Hertfordshire, where his peculiar puritanical opinions involved him in difficulties with his ecclesiastical superiors. In January, 1629, he was called before the High Commission Court on the charge of having used in his sermons certain expressions condemnatory of the Church, and is said to have made his submission to Bishop Laud. In 1635 he was again prosecuted for opposing the railing in of the communion table at Ware; was suspended, cast into prison, condemned to costs, and obliged to make a humiliating recantation.

He left England late in 1637, and arrived at Plymouth, Mass., in May, 1638. For about three years he preached with Mr. Royner at Plymouth, and in 1641 was elected pastor of the church at Scituate, where he preached for twelve years. His pastorate in Scituate was for many reasons unpleasant to him, partly because of a difference of opinion among his parishioners, and partly because of a lack of financial support. His persecutor, Bishop Laud, had been executed, and a change had taken place in the attitude of the church; Mr. Chauncy was invited to return to Ware, and had reached Boston, whence he was to sail, when he was invited to become president of Harvard College. He was inaugurated Nov. 29, 1654, and entered upon the duties of the office at a salary of £100 per annum. He is the author of: The Plain Doctrine of the Justification of a Sinner in the Sight of God, Six and Twenty Sermons (1659), and Antisynodalia Scripta Americana.4 He married Catharine Eyre, daughter of Robert Eyre and Agnes Still, on 17 March 1630 in Ware, Hertfordshire, they had six sons, all bred to the ministry, and two daughters.4,6 Charles Chauncy emigrated in December 1637 to Plymouth, New England.6 On 29 November 1654 he was a President of Harvard College.3 He died on 19 February 1671 in Cambridge, Massachusetts.2

Child of Charles Chauncy and Catharine Eyre

Citations

  1. [S25] Samuel Sewall, Diary of Samuel Sewall (1973 ed.), p. 1087.
  2. [S75] Frederick Lewis Weis, Colonial Clergy, p. 53.
  3. [S18] Various editors, Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans, Vol. 2 p.176.
  4. [S18] Various editors, Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans, Vol. 2 p.175.
  5. [S286] William Chauncey Fowler, Memorials of the Chaunceys, p. 1.
  6. [S21] Various editors, Dictionary of National Biography.

Charles Chauncy1

M, b. 23 April 1758, d. 23 April 1758
     Charles Chauncy died on 23 April 1758.2 He was born on 23 April 1758.2 He was the son of Charles Chauncy and Mary Cutts.2

Citations

  1. [S287] Robert Chancey, "Chauncy," e-mail to unknown recipient, October 2006.
  2. [S83] NEHGR, Vol. 10 p. 336.

Charles Chauncy1

M, b. 1701, d. 1704
     Charles Chauncy was born in 1701.1 He was the son of Charles Chauncy and Sarah Walley.1 Charles Chauncy died in 1704.1

Citations

  1. [S102] Annie Haven Thwing, Inhabitants of the Town of Boston, 15086.

Charles Chauncy1

M, b. 22 April 1761, d. 10 September 1789
     Charles Chauncy was born on 22 April 1761.1 He was the son of Charles Chauncy and Joanna Gerrish.1 Went insane when he was sixteen years old and continued so until a week before his death. Charles Chauncy died on 10 September 1789 at the age of 28.1

Citations

  1. [S286] William Chauncey Fowler, Memorials of the Chaunceys, p. 47 (chart).

Rev. Dr. Charles Chauncy D.D.1

M, b. 1 January 1704/5, d. 10 February 1787
     Rev. Dr. Charles Chauncy D.D. was born on 1 January 1704/5 in Boston.2 He was the son of Charles Chauncy and Sarah Walley.2 Rev. Dr. Charles Chauncy D.D. graduated in 1721 from Harvard.2 He married firstly Elizabeth Hirst, daughter of Grove Hirst and Elizabeth Sewall, on 14 February 1727/28.3,4 Rev. Dr. Charles Chauncy D.D. married secondly Elizabeth Phillips (widow Townsend), daughter of John Phillips and Mary (Unknown), on 8 January 1738/39.3 Rev. Dr. Charles Chauncy D.D. died on 10 February 1787 at the age of 82.2

Chauncy Charles, pastor of the first church in Boston, was a great grandson of president Chauncy, and had much of the genius and spirit of his ancestor. He was born, Jan. 1st, 1705. His father, the youngest son of the rev. Isaac Chauncy, Berry street, settled in Boston, as a merchant. Charles was only seven years old when his father died; but had friends, who were disposed to give him every advantage of education. At twelve years old he was sent to Harvard College; was graduated, 1721, and considered as one of the best scholars who had ever received the honours of that seminary. It afforded great pleasure to wise and good men of those times to see a descendant of that president, who had done so much honour to New England, come into life with such high recommendations ; and their hopes were highly gratified when he made divinity his study. As soon as Mr. Wadsworth was removed from the first church, to preside at Cambridge, the eyes of that people were fixed upon this young man, and he was associated with Mr. Foxcroft in the work of the ministry. He was ordained, 1727. Mr. Foxcroft and he were colleague pastors for about 40 years. After the death of his colleague, he performed the whole parochial duty nearly ten years. In June, 1778, the rev. Mr. John Clark was settled with him, whom he treated as a son, and who was always sensible of his paternal regards. Dr. Chauncy was one of the greatest divines in New England; no one except president Edwards, and the late Dr. Mayhew, has been so much known among the literati of Europe, or printed more books upon theological subjects. He took great delight in studying the scriptures. Feeling the sacred obligations of morality, he impressed them upon the minds of others in the most rational and evangelical manner. When he preached upon the faith of the gospel, he reasoned of righteousness, temperance and a judgement to come. It was said that he wanted the graces of delivery, and taste in composition. But it was his object to exhibit the most sublime truths in simplicity of speech, and he never, therefore, studied to have his periods polished, or his style adorned with rhetorical figures. His favourite authors were, Tillotson of the episcopal church, and Baxter among the puritans. For he preferred the rich vein of sentiment in the sermons of the English divines, to that tinsel of French declamation so fashionable in our modern way of preaching. Upon some occasions, however, Dr Chauncy could raise his feeble voice, and manifest a vigour and animation, which would arrest the attention of the most careless hearer, and have a deeper effect, than the oratory which is thought by many to be irresistibly persuasive : at all times, he was argumentative and perspicuous, and made an admirable practical use of the sentiments he delivered. But it is as an author we are chiefly to view Dr. Chauncy in this biographical sketch. His clear head, his quick conception, and comprehensive view of every subject enabled him to write with ease and propriety. However quick, and sudden, and unguarded in his expressions when discussing things in conversation, he reasoned coolly in all his controversial writings. His ideas were so well arranged, and he had such a command of them, that he managed every subject with equal candour, liberality, fairness and skill. In the episcopal controversy he obtained great celebrity. He first began this in a sermon upon the validity of presbyterian ordination preached at the Dudleian lecture, at Cambridge, 1762. In 1767 he wrote his remarks upon a sermon of the bishop of Landaff. In 1771 he printed a complete view of episcopacy, "the two first centuries." Beside these, he had a particular controversy upon the subject of the American episcopate ; he wrote "an appeal to the publick answered in behalf of non episcopal churches" when Dr. Chandler of Elizabethtown, offered his appeal to the publick, "in favour of episcopal churches ; to this Dr. Chandler wrote an answer styled, " the appeal defended, " &c. Dr. Chauney made a reply to the appeal defended, and to this Dr. Chandler also replied in another large pamphlet. In the Whitefieldian controversy, Dr. Chauncy discovered more zeal than in his other works. In 1742 and 1743 he published a "sermon on the various gifts of ministers;" one upon "enthusiasm," and another on the "outpourings of the Holy Ghost;" he also printed an "account of the French prophets," and "seasonable thoughts on the state of religion." At the time of the great revival of religion, there were certain things of a dangerous tendency mingled with it, which the Dr. saw fit to correct. It makes an octavo volume in five parts, and by the list of subscribers, we find he was encouraged by many worthy ministers who differed from him in their doctrinal sentiments. His other large works are, "twelve sermons on seasonable and important subjects," chiefly upon justification, in opposition to the opinion of Robert Sandinian, 1765; the "mystery hid from ages, or the salvation of all men;" "dissertations upon the benevolence of the Deity;" these were printed 1784, and the next year he printed a volume "on the fall of man and its consequences ."
In 1742, he received his diploma from the university of Edinburgh, the first from that seminary to an American divine. He was also one of the London board of commissioners for propagating the gospel among the Indians; and a corresponding member of the board in Scotland. His health, cheerfulness, activity and the powers of his mind continued to old age. He died, Feb. 10, 1787. Mr. Clarke preached his funeral sermon. Eliot: Biographical Dictionary of New England, p. 101.5

Children of Rev. Dr. Charles Chauncy D.D. and Elizabeth Hirst

Citations

  1. [S8] John Langdon Sibley, Biographical Sketches, 1659-1677., p.359.
  2. [S25] Samuel Sewall, Diary of Samuel Sewall (1973 ed.), p. 1087.
  3. [S102] Annie Haven Thwing, Inhabitants of the Town of Boston, 1825.
  4. [S286] William Chauncey Fowler, Memorials of the Chaunceys, p. 53.
  5. [S587] John Eliot, New England Biographical Dictionary, p. 101.
  6. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.