James Kierstede Livingston1

M, b. 29 December 1749, d. 1777
     James Kierstede Livingston was born on 29 December 1749.2 He was the son of Robert James Livingston and Susanna Smith.1 James Kierstede Livingston died in 1777 unmarried.1,2

Citations

  1. [S133] Robert Sewell, Information from Robert Sewell.
  2. [S167] William S. Pelletreau, Wills of the Smith families, p. 125.

James Smith Livingston

M, b. 29 July 1764, d. 20 October 1765
     James Smith Livingston was born on 29 July 1764. He was the son of Peter Robert Livingston and Margaret Livingston. James Smith Livingston died on 20 October 1765 at the age of 1.

James Smith Livingston

M, b. 24 May 1769, d. 11 January 1839
     James Smith Livingston was born on 24 May 1769. He was the son of Peter Robert Livingston and Margaret Livingston. James Smith Livingston died on 11 January 1839 at the age of 69.

Jane Livingston1

F, b. 1798
     Jane Livingston was born in 1798.1 She was the daughter of Abraham Livingston and Maria Peoples.1

Citations

  1. [S480] Emma Ten Broek Runk, The Ten Broeck Genealogy, #430.

Janet Livingston1

F, b. 28 September 1643, d. August 1696
     Janet Livingston was born on 28 September 1643 in Stranraer.1,2 She was the daughter of Rev. John Livingston of Ancrum and Janet Fleming.1 Janet Livingston died in August 1696 at the age of 52.3

Citations

  1. [S62] William Richard Cutter, New England Families.
  2. [S80] Arthur Meredyth Burke, Prominent Families, Livingston.
  3. [S131] George Norbury MacKenzie, Colonial families of the United States, Vol. VI p. 334.

Janet Livingston1

F, b. 1703
     Janet Livingston was born in 1703.1 She was the daughter of Robert Livingston, "The Nephew" and Margarita Schuyler.1 Janet Livingston married Colonel Henry Beekman.1

Child of Janet Livingston and Colonel Henry Beekman

Citations

  1. [S62] William Richard Cutter, New England Families.

Janet Livingston1

F, b. 27 August 1743, d. November 1827
     Janet Livingston was born on 27 August 1743.2 She was the daughter of Judge Robert Robert Livingston and Margaret Beekman.1 Janet Livingston married General Richard Montgomery, son of Thomas Montgomery, on 24 July 1773 there were no issue.1 Janet Livingston died in November 1827 in Montgomery Place, near Barrytown, at the age of 84.1

Citations

  1. [S18] Various editors, Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans.
  2. [S80] Arthur Meredyth Burke, Prominent Families, Livingston.

Janet Livingston1

F, d. 3 April 1690
     Janet Livingston was the daughter of Rev. William Livingston and Nicola Somervell.1 Janet Livingston died on 3 April 1690.1

Citations

  1. [S80] Arthur Meredyth Burke, Prominent Families, Livingston.

Janet Livingston1

F, b. 24 July 1751
     Janet Livingston was born on 24 July 1751 in New York.1 She was the daughter of John Livingston and Catryna Ten Broeck.1 Janet Livingston married Jacob Van der Heyden.1 Janet Livingston died in Albany.1

Citations

  1. [S480] Emma Ten Broek Runk, The Ten Broeck Genealogy, #218.

Janet Cornelia Livingston1

F
     Janet Cornelia Livingston was the daughter of John Henry Livingston and Alice Delafield Clarkson.1

Citations

  1. [S81] Burke, Landed Gentry, p. 2792.

Jasper Hall Livingston1

M, b. 3 December 1780, d. 9 August 1835
     Jasper Hall Livingston was born on 3 December 1780.1 He was the son of Philip Philip Livingston and Sarah Johnson.1 Jasper Hall Livingston married Eliza Livingston, daughter of Colonel Henry Brockholst Livingston, on 14 July 1802.1 Jasper Hall Livingston died on 9 August 1835 at the age of 54.2

Citations

  1. [S80] Arthur Meredyth Burke, Prominent Families, Livingston.
  2. [S131] George Norbury MacKenzie, Colonial families of the United States, Vol. VI p. 338.

Jean Livingston1

F
     Jean Livingston was the daughter of Rev. William Livingston and Agnes Livingston.1

Citations

  1. [S80] Arthur Meredyth Burke, Prominent Families, Livingston.

Jean Livingston1

F
     Jean Livingston was the daughter of Rev. William Livingston and Nicola Somervell.1

Citations

  1. [S80] Arthur Meredyth Burke, Prominent Families, Livingston.

Jennet Livingston1

F, b. 1 November 1730, d. 1 November 1819
Janet Livingston
     Jennet Livingston was born on 1 November 1730 in New York, New York.2,3 She was the daughter of James Livingston and Maria Kierstede.2 Jennet Livingston married Chief Justice Hon. William Smith, son of Judge William Smith and Mary Hett, on 3 November 1752.3 Jennet Livingston died on 1 November 1819 in Québec City at the age of 89 at the house of her daughter Harriet (Henrietta.)2,4,5

Children of Jennet Livingston and Chief Justice Hon. William Smith

Citations

  1. [S427] Magazine of American History, Vol. 6, p. 438.
  2. [S40] Unknown compiler, "The Honourable William Smith 1728-1793", Ancestral File, p51.
  3. [S133] Robert Sewell, Information from Robert Sewell.
  4. [S26] Hector Livingston Duff, Sewells in the New World, p. 121.
  5. [S541] William Smith, History of New York, p. xv.
  6. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.

Joanna Livingston1

F, b. 14 September 1759, d. 1 March 1829
     Joanna Livingston was born on 14 September 1759.2 She was the daughter of Judge Robert Robert Livingston and Margaret Beekman.1 Joanna Livingston married Peter R. Livingston, son of Robert James Livingston and Susanna Smith.1 Joanna Livingston died on 1 March 1829 at the age of 69 (or 1827) s.n.p.1,2,3

Citations

  1. [S44] George Dangerfield, Chancellor Livingston, chart.
  2. [S80] Arthur Meredyth Burke, Prominent Families, Livingston.
  3. [S131] George Norbury MacKenzie, Colonial families of the United States, Vol. VI p. 336.

Joanna Livingston1

F, b. September 1647, d. October 1648
     Joanna Livingston was born in September 1647.2 She was the daughter of Rev. John Livingston of Ancrum and Janet Fleming.1 Joanna Livingston died in October 1648 at the age of 1.2

Citations

  1. [S80] Arthur Meredyth Burke, Prominent Families, Livingston.
  2. [S131] George Norbury MacKenzie, Colonial families of the United States, Vol. VI p. 334.

Johanna Livingston1

F, b. 10 December 1694, d. before 1735
     Johanna Livingston was born on 10 December 1694.2 She was the daughter of Hon. Robert Livingston, "First Lord of the Manor" and Alida Schuyler.1 Johanna Livingston married Cornelius Gerrit Van Horne in 1720.1 Johanna Livingston died before 1735.1

Citations

  1. [S44] George Dangerfield, Chancellor Livingston, chart.
  2. [S80] Arthur Meredyth Burke, Prominent Families, Livingston.

Johanna Philippina Livingston1,2

F, b. 1 February 1684, d. 24 January 1689/90
     Johanna Philippina Livingston was born on 1 February 1684.1 She was the daughter of Hon. Robert Livingston, "First Lord of the Manor" and Alida Schuyler.1 Johanna Philippina Livingston died on 24 January 1689/90 at the age of 5.2

Citations

  1. [S80] Arthur Meredyth Burke, Prominent Families, Livingston.
  2. [S131] George Norbury MacKenzie, Colonial families of the United States, Vol. VI p. 334.

John Livingston1

M, b. 6 March 1709, d. 17 September 1791
     John Livingston was baptised on 6 March 1709 at Albany, New York.2 He was the son of Robert Livingston, "The Nephew" and Margarita Schuyler.1 John Livingston married Catryna Ten Broeck, daughter of Dirck Ten Broeck and Margarita Cuyler, on 6 September 1739.2 John Livingston died on 17 September 1791 in Stillwater, New York, at the age of 82.1,2

Children of John Livingston and Catryna Ten Broeck

Citations

  1. [S62] William Richard Cutter, New England Families.
  2. [S480] Emma Ten Broek Runk, The Ten Broeck Genealogy, #102.
  3. [S480] Emma Ten Broek Runk, The Ten Broeck Genealogy, #213.
  4. [S480] Emma Ten Broek Runk, The Ten Broeck Genealogy, #214.
  5. [S480] Emma Ten Broek Runk, The Ten Broeck Genealogy, #215.
  6. [S113] William Addams Reitwiesner, Bush ancestry.
  7. [S480] Emma Ten Broek Runk, The Ten Broeck Genealogy, #217.
  8. [S480] Emma Ten Broek Runk, The Ten Broeck Genealogy, #218.
  9. [S480] Emma Ten Broek Runk, The Ten Broeck Genealogy, #219.
  10. [S480] Emma Ten Broek Runk, The Ten Broeck Genealogy, #220.
  11. [S480] Emma Ten Broek Runk, The Ten Broeck Genealogy, #221.

John Livingston1

M, b. 21 February 1749/50, d. 24 October 1822
     John Livingston was born on 21 February 1749/50 in New York.2 He was the son of Robert Livingston, Jr. "Third Lord of the Manor" and Maria Thong.1 John Livingston married firstly Mary Ann Le Roy, daughter of Jacob Le Roy and Cornelia Rutgers, on 11 May 1775; of this marriage there were ten children, one died young.1,3 John Livingston was appointed in 1778, A.D.C. to Governor Clinton.3 He married Catharine Livingston, daughter of Governor William Livingston and Susannah French, on 3 November 1796.2 John Livingston died on 24 October 1822 in Oak Hill, Columbia County, at the age of 72.2

Children of John Livingston and Mary Ann Le Roy

Citations

  1. [S44] George Dangerfield, Chancellor Livingston, chart.
  2. [S162] Unknown author, Livingstone Genealogy, p. 546.
  3. [S81] Burke, Landed Gentry, p. 2793.
  4. [S250] Saint Nicholas Society, Vol. 1. p 137.

John Livingston1

M, b. 11 April 1714, d. 21 July 1786
     John Livingston was baptised on 11 April 1714 at Albany.2,3 He was the son of Philip Livingston, "Second Lord of the Manor" and Catharine Van Brugh.1 John Livingston married Catherine de Peyster, daughter of Abraham de Peyster, on 3 December 1742.1,4 John Livingston died on 21 July 1786 at the age of 72.5

Child of John Livingston and Catherine de Peyster

Citations

  1. [S44] George Dangerfield, Chancellor Livingston, chart.
  2. [S80] Arthur Meredyth Burke, Prominent Families, Livingston.
  3. [S131] George Norbury MacKenzie, Colonial families of the United States, Vol. VI p. 337.
  4. [S81] Burke, Landed Gentry, p. 2793.
  5. [S205] Newspaper, The Daily Advertiser (New York), 24 July 1786.
  6. [S113] William Addams Reitwiesner, Bush ancestry.

John Livingston1

M, b. 30 June 1636, d. 8 January 1639
     John Livingston was born on 30 June 1636 in Ireland.1 He was the son of Rev. John Livingston of Ancrum and Janet Fleming.1 John Livingston died on 8 January 1639 at the age of 2.2

Citations

  1. [S80] Arthur Meredyth Burke, Prominent Families, Livingston.
  2. [S131] George Norbury MacKenzie, Colonial families of the United States, Vol. VI p. 334.

John Livingston1

M, b. 20 August 1644, d. October 1645
     John Livingston was born on 20 August 1644.1 He was the son of Rev. John Livingston of Ancrum and Janet Fleming.1 John Livingston died in October 1645 at the age of 1.2

Citations

  1. [S80] Arthur Meredyth Burke, Prominent Families, Livingston.
  2. [S131] George Norbury MacKenzie, Colonial families of the United States, Vol. VI p. 334.

John Livingston1

M

Child of John Livingston

Citations

  1. [S81] Burke, Landed Gentry, p. 2793.
  2. [S81] Burke, Landed Gentry, p. 2792.

John Livingston1

M, b. 29 June 1652, d. 12 October 1652
     John Livingston was born on 29 June 1652.1 He was the son of Rev. John Livingston of Ancrum and Janet Fleming.1 John Livingston died on 12 October 1652.1

Citations

  1. [S131] George Norbury MacKenzie, Colonial families of the United States, Vol. VI p. 334.

John Livingston1

M
     John Livingston was the son of Dirck (Richard) Livingston and Elizabeth Rencour.1 John Livingston died in Martinico, West Indies, in the merchant service.1

Citations

  1. [S480] Emma Ten Broek Runk, The Ten Broeck Genealogy, #412.

John Livingston1

M, b. 19 May 1777
     John Livingston was born on 19 May 1777.1 He was the son of James Livingston and Elizabeth Simpson.1

Citations

  1. [S480] Emma Ten Broek Runk, The Ten Broeck Genealogy, #417.

Colonel John Livingston1

M, b. 26 April 1680, d. 19 February 1719/20
     Colonel John Livingston was born on 26 April 1680 in New York.1,2,3 He was the son of Hon. Robert Livingston, "First Lord of the Manor" and Alida Schuyler.1 Colonel John Livingston married firstly Mary Winthrop, daughter of Governor Fitz-John Winthrop, in April 1701 at New London, Connecticut.2 Livingston's marriage to Governor Fitz-John Winthrop's daughter was no doubt instrumental in his taking up residence in New London and subsequently receiving a commission in the Connecticut militia. He had served previously in the New York militia. When not occupied by military affairs, Livingston was a merchant. In 1701 he owned the sloop Mary, in partnership with his brother-in-law, Samuel Vetch. They became involved in the illegal but profitable trade with Canada, a trade which soon came to the attention of colonial authorities. As late as 1706 it was rumoured that Livingston was still involved in such nefarious activities. During 1706-7 Livingston represented New London as a deputy to the general assembly. He also speculated in Indian lands during this period.
Livingston's restless nature suited him well for the life of a soldier. Known as "the Mohauk," he acquired great influence among the New England Indians, especially the Five Nations. His ability to control the Indians marked him as a valuable asset to colonial commanders. In August 1704 after the outbreak of Queen Anne's War, he commanded a company of "Volunteers English & Indians to reinforce the Frontiers." A month later Livingston had his "first adventure" in "a publick capassety" when his father-in-law appointed him "to visit the 5 Nations" with commissioners appointed by Governor Dudley of Massachusetts. Though the commissioners gained assurances that the Five Nations would "take up the Hatchet," this support was not utilized at the time.

Livingston was serving as a Connecticut officer on the Massachusetts frontier early in 1705 when he learned that Dudley was sending a delegation to Quebec to negotiate an exchange of prisoners. Livingston volunteered and was sent overland from Albany to begin negotiations. Although "the Expense and Industry of our Commissioners in this Affair was very great," release was obtained for only a few of the 117 captives, most notably the Reverend John Williams. Livingston, termed a "very honourable man" by Governor RIGAUD de Vaudreuil, returned to New England in June 1705 with Captain Augustin le Gardeur de Courtemanche, the French governor's agent for the exchange of prisoners, who continued the negotiations with Dudley.

In 1709 Livingston, now a major, prepared to take part in the still-born Vetch expedition against Quebec. A year later he was again with Vetch, this time as commander of a party of Indians which flanked the main body of troops in the successful expedition led by Francis Nicholson against Port-Royal (Annapolis Royal, N.S.) With Auger de Subercase's surrender in October 1710, a council of war resolved that Livingston, accompanied by the Baron de Saint-Castin Ernard-Anselme d'Abbadie, "should go to the Governour of Canada, about the exchange of Captives, and inform him how Matters were" at Annapolis Royal. Livingston was, as Vetch put it, "perhaps the only Brittish subject of any figure or character capable of such extraordinary undertakings." The "Journall" that he kept attests to the arduous nature of this mission, which would have come to an early end had not Saint-Castin intervened to save Livingston from death "in a barbarous manner" at the hands of a distraught Indian. After almost two months' hard travel, Livingston arrived in December 1710 at Quebec where he was received "with all imaginable marks of civillity." His time in Quebec was well spent. While awaiting the arrival from Montreal of Hertel de Rouville and Simon Dupuy, agents whom Vaudreuil was sending to New England to continue the negotiations and "to obtain information through them of the movements of our enemies," Livingston prepared notes for "A View of Canada," an account of the fortifications and troops at Quebec. This was probably the chief purpose of the mission, for a successful expedition against Quebec had long been in Vetch's mind.

Livingston returned to New England late in February 1710/11 and at Vetch's urging prepared to leave for England. It was hoped that his knowledge of Canada could be used to persuade the court to renew plans for a general assault on New France. Stormy weather postponed his trip and word from England that another expedition was under way made it unnecessary. As preparations for the Walker expedition began, Livingston's knowledge of Quebec was utilized by both Admiral Walker and General John Hill. Livingston was questioned by the general "about the situation and works of Quebec, and was thought to give a very good account of it." The failure of Walker to navigate the St Lawrence successfully meant that Livingston's knowledge of Quebec could not be put to use.
Having "a verry great sway amongst them," Livingston, now a colonel, spent the better part of the next year and a half recruiting Iroquois for scouting work around Annapolis Royal and as a result was "considerably out of pockett." The fort was deprived of the officer best able to control the Indians when Livingston left at the end of 1712. He returned to New London where he was granted the right to erect a saw-mill in 1713. He liquidated his holdings there in 1718 and sailed for England where he hoped to recoup the money he had lost in supplying the garrison at Annapolis Royal. His early death denied him the honour of succeeding his father as the second lord of the Livingston manor in New York.

Although he was tied by blood or marriage to some of the most important families in New England, Livingston remains an obscure figure who moved only at the edges of the important events of his time; a figure who appeared to be more at home with the Indians than with his fellow colonials.4 Colonel John Livingston married secondly Elizabeth Knight, daughter of Mrs Sarah Knight, on 1 October 1713 at Boston.2 Colonel John Livingston died on 19 February 1719/20 at the age of 39 s.n.p.2

Citations

  1. [S44] George Dangerfield, Chancellor Livingston, Chart.
  2. [S58] Various Editors, Dictionary of Canadian Biography, vol. II p. 436.
  3. [S131] George Norbury MacKenzie, Colonial families of the United States, Vol. VI p. 334.
  4. [S58] Various Editors, Dictionary of Canadian Biography, vol. II p. 436 etc. article by John David Krugler.

Sir John Livingston, Lord of Callendar1

M, d. 1402
     Sir John Livingston, Lord of Callendar was the son of Sir William de Livingston, and Christian de Callendar.1 Sir John Livingston, Lord of Callendar married secondly Agnes Douglas of Dalkeith in 1381.2 Sir John Livingston, Lord of Callendar married firstly Daughter of John Menteith, of Kerse, daughter of John Menteith of Kerse.1 Sir John Livingston, Lord of Callendar died in 1402 slain at the battle of Homildon Hill (Northumberland) where the Earl of Northumberland and his son Hotspur defeated the Earl of Douglas and Duke of Albany.1

Citations

  1. [S26] Hector Livingston Duff, Sewells in the New World, p. 111.
  2. [S163] Edwin Brockholst Livingston, Livingstons of Callendar, p. 485.

John Henry Livingston1

M, b. 8 July 1848, d. 27 January 1927
     John Henry Livingston. Lawyer. He was born on 8 July 1848 in Oak Hill, Columbia County, New York.1 He was the son of Clermont Livingston and Cornelia Livingston.1 John Henry Livingston graduated in 1869 from Columbia.1 He married firstly Catherine Livingston Hamersley, daughter of John William Hamersley, on 2 November 1871.2 John Henry Livingston married Alice Delafield Clarkson, daughter of Howard Clarkson, on 9 November 1906.2 John Henry Livingston died on 27 January 1927 at the age of 78.2

Child of John Henry Livingston and Catherine Livingston Hamersley

Citations

  1. [S80] Arthur Meredyth Burke, Prominent Families, Livingston.
  2. [S81] Burke, Landed Gentry, p. 2792.
  3. [S81] Burke, Landed Gentry, p. 2793.