Mark Chisholm1

M
     Mark Chisholm was the son of W. Chisholm and Helen Turnbull.2 Mark Chisholm married Barbara Bennet, daughter of Archibald Bennet, on 26 September 1714 in Ancrum, Roxburgshire.2,3

Children of Mark Chisholm and Barbara Bennet

Citations

  1. [S136] George Tancred, Rulewater, p. 190.
  2. [S136] George Tancred, Rulewater, p. 189.
  3. [S89] Family Search, Parish registers, 1703-1855 Church of Scotland. Parish Church of Ancrum.

W. Chisholm1

M
     W. Chisholm. Of Parkhill in Borthwick.1 He married Helen Turnbull.1 By a post-nuptual contract by W. Chisholm and Helen Turnbull which was signed on 21 October 1714 "with ane consent" disponed the lands of Fotherlie and Ruletownhead to their son, Mark Chisolm.2

Child of W. Chisholm and Helen Turnbull

Citations

  1. [S136] George Tancred, Rulewater, p. 189.
  2. [S136] George Tancred, Rulewater, p. 190.

Mary Chittenden1

F, b. 1647, d. 1712
     Mary Chittenden was born in 1647.2 She married John Leete, son of Governor William Leete and Anne Payne, on 4 October 1670 in Guilford, Connecticut.1,2 Mary Chittenden died in 1712.2

Citations

  1. [S62] William Richard Cutter, New England Families, p. 176.
  2. [S123] Clarence Almon Torrey, New England Marriages Prior to 1700.

(?) Choate1

M
     (?) Choate was the son of Rufus Choate.1

Citations

  1. [S18] Various editors, Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans, vol. 2, p. 194.

David Choate1

M, b. 29 November 1796, d. 17 December 1872
     David Choate was born on 29 November 1796 in Chebacco, Ipswich, Massachusetts.1 He was the son of Capt. David Choate and Miriam Foster.1 He was employed as a school teacher from 1815 to 1842. He inaugurated and developed the local high school and was one of the founders of the Essex County Teachers' Association, and was for many years its president; was one of the trustees of the Mount Holyoke Female Seminary from its incorporation in 1836; was a trustee of Dummer Academy, Byfield, Mass., 1840-50; a member of the State Legislature, 1839-41, and a member of the State Senate and chairman of the Committee on Education, 1841-42. He was for many years justice of the peace. He wrote An Agricultural and Geological survey of Essex County, which was published by the Essex County Agricultural Society, of which he was an officer and member.1 David Choate married Elizabeth Wade on 14 January 1828.2 David Choate died on 17 December 1872 in Ipswich, Massachusetts, at the age of 76.3

Citations

  1. [S18] Various editors, Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans, vol. 2, p. 194.
  2. [S268] Ephraim Orcutt Jameson, The Choates in America, p. 109.
  3. [S268] Ephraim Orcutt Jameson, The Choates in America, p. 196.

Capt. David Choate1

M, b. 29 November 1757, d. 28 March 1808
     Capt. David Choate was born on 29 November 1757 in Chebacco, Ipswich, Massachusetts.2 He married firstly Mary Cogswell on 24 June 1784.2 Capt. David Choate married secondly Miriam Foster on 15 October 1791.2 Capt. David Choate died on 28 March 1808 at the age of 50.2

Children of Capt. David Choate and Miriam Foster

Citations

  1. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.
  2. [S268] Ephraim Orcutt Jameson, The Choates in America, p. 109.
  3. [S18] Various editors, Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans, vol. 2, p. 194.

Hannah Choate1

F, b. 12 August 1794, d. 9 February 1837
     Hannah Choate was born on 12 August 1794 in Chebacco, Ipswich, Massachusetts.1,2 She was the daughter of Capt. David Choate and Miriam Foster.1 Hannah Choate married Rev. Robert Crowell on 2 September 1822.1 Hannah Choate died on 9 February 1837 at the age of 42.1

Citations

  1. [S268] Ephraim Orcutt Jameson, The Choates in America, p. 109.
  2. [S268] Ephraim Orcutt Jameson, The Choates in America, p. 196.

Job Choate1

M, b. 25 December 1806, d. 10 March 1808
     Job Choate was born on 25 December 1806.1 He was the son of Capt. David Choate and Miriam Foster.1 Job Choate died on 10 March 1808 at the age of 1.1

Citations

  1. [S268] Ephraim Orcutt Jameson, The Choates in America, p. 109.

Mary Choate1

F, b. 3 October 1792, d. 28 March 1855
     Mary Choate was born on 3 October 1792 in Chebacco, Ipswich, Massachusetts.2 She was the daughter of Capt. David Choate and Miriam Foster.1 Mary Choate married Dr. Thomas Sewall, son of Thomas Sewall and Priscilla Coney, on 28 November 1813 in Ipswich, Massachusetts.3 Mary Choate died on 28 March 1855 in Rockville, Maryland, at the residence of her son and was buried in the Wesley Chapel burying ground near Columbia College. Apparently she is commemorated on her husband's gravestone in Oakhill Cemetery, Washington, D.C. where the date of her death is given as 8 April 1855 at the age of 62.4,5,6

Child of Mary Choate and Dr. Thomas Sewall

Citations

  1. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.
  2. [S268] Ephraim Orcutt Jameson, The Choates in America, p. 195.
  3. [S130] Massachusetts Vital Records.
  4. [S205] Newspaper, The Washington Star, March 29, 1855.
  5. [S205] Newspaper, Daily National Intelligencer, (Washington, DC) Saturday, March 31, 1855.
  6. [S392] Website findagrave.com (http://www.findagrave.com/) "# 55405922."

Rufus Choate1

M, b. 1 October 1799, d. 13 July 1859
     Rufus Choate was born on 1 October 1799 in Ipswich, Massachusetts.2 He was the son of Capt. David Choate and Miriam Foster.1 His father's sterling integrity and unusual intellectual endowment marked him as a superior man, and his mother's keen perceptions, ready wit, and native dignity of bearing were remarkable. Rufus was early noted for his insatiable thirst for knowledge, for his tenacious memory, and his extraordinary precocity. He could recite whole pages of Pilgrim's Progress when he was but six years old, and he had perused the greater part of the village library before he was ten.
He entered Dartmouth College at the age of sixteen, after attending the academy at New Hampton, N.H., for a term, and was graduated with the valedictory in 1819. The famous Dartmouth College case was on trial during his undergraduate days, and it was Webster's great speech in connection therewith that so inspired Choate as to lead to his final choice of the law as his profession. After tutoring at Dartmouth for a year, he spent three years in Washington, D. C., studying law under William Wirt, attorney-general of the United States in 1823 was admitted to the bar, and for five years practised at Danvers, Mass. In 1825 he was sent to the state legislature as a representative, and in 1827 as a senator. He was chosen as a representative in Congress in 1830, and distinguished himself by a brilliant speech in the 22nd Congress on the tariff.
He was re-elected in 1832 to the 23rd Congress, but resigned his seat at the close of the first session and removed to Boston, where he devoted himself to his profession, and acquired a reputation as an eloquent, powerful and successful advocate. When in 1841 Daniel Webster accepted the portfolio of state in President Harrison's cabinet, Mr. Choate was elected to fill the seat he had vacated in the senate, and he made several brilliant speeches, notably those on the tariff, the Oregon boundary, the fiscal bank-bill, the Smithsonian institution, and the annexation of Texas. At the close of the term Mr. Webster was returned to the senate, and Mr. Choate once more resumed the practice of his profession. He went to Europe in 1850, and during his brief tour in England and on the continent a most forcible impression was made upon his mind by his observation of the characteristics of the older civilizations of the world, and, in his comparison of these with those of the newer, he saw the perils that were likely to follow a disruption of the union existing between the states. In his earnest desire to avoid such disruption will be found the key to his whole later life, and his last public utterance was an oration in behalf of an undivided nation. In 1852 he was a delegate to the Whig national convention at Baltimore, and there urged the nomination of Daniel Webster for the presidency. He was a delegate to the state convention of 1853, and took an important part in revising the constitution of Massachusetts. In 1856 he supported the Democratic national ticket, and made some speeches in the interest of Buchanan and Breckinridge. Busy as was his life he yet devoted a portion of each day to the study of literature, history, and philosophy, and it was this habit, together with his tenacious memory, which made him one of the most scholarly of public men. He was especially fond of Greek literature, and was only restrained from writing a history of Greece by seeing the early volume of Grote's great work. He contemplated a visit to Europe in 1859, and had proceeded as far as Halifax when his health failed so utterly that his son, who accompanied him, decided to return home, and while resting at the lodgings he had temporarily taken he died suddenly. Among his most famous speeches will always be named: the eulogy on President Harrison (1841); an address upon the anniversary of the landing of the pilgrims (1843); a eulogy on Daniel Webster (1853); an address at the dedication of the Peabody institution in Danvers (1854); an oration before the young men's Democratic club of Boston (1858); two addresses before the law-school at Cambridge, Mass., and two lectures before the Mercantile library association of Boston; but no adequate idea of his wonderful oratory can be obtained from reading his speeches. His works, with a memoir, published in two volumes, was prepared by Samuel Gilman Brown (1862.)2 Rufus Choate married Helen Olcott on 29 March 1825.3 Rufus Choate died on 13 July 1859 in Halifax, Nova Scotia, at the age of 59.2

Child of Rufus Choate

Citations

  1. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.
  2. [S18] Various editors, Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans, vol. 2, p. 194.
  3. [S268] Ephraim Orcutt Jameson, The Choates in America, p. 109.

Washington Choate1

M, b. 17 January 1803, d. 27 February 1822
     Washington Choate was born on 17 January 1803.1 He was the son of Capt. David Choate and Miriam Foster.1 Washington Choate died on 27 February 1822 at the age of 19.1

Citations

  1. [S268] Ephraim Orcutt Jameson, The Choates in America, p. 109.

Henry Cholmeley1

M
     Henry Cholmeley married Maude or Matilda Westcote of Handsacre on 23 November 1557 in St. Nicholas, Mavesyn Ridware, Staffordshire.1 Henry Cholmeley was buried on 21 May 1577 in Mavesyn Ridware, Staffordshire.2

Citations

  1. [S397] Staffordshire Parish Registers Society, Mavesyn Ridware Parish Registers, p. 33.
  2. [S397] Staffordshire Parish Registers Society, Mavesyn Ridware Parish Registers, p. 35.

Elizabeth Chrichton1

F, d. 9 June 1479
     Elizabeth Chrichton was the daughter of Lord Chancellor William Chrichton, 1st Lord Chrichton.1 Elizabeth Chrichton married Alexander Seton, Master of Gordon, 1st Earl of Huntly, son of Alexander Seton 1st Lord Gordon and Elizabeth Gordon, before 18 March 1439. Elizabeth Chrichton died on 9 June 1479 in Strathbogie.1

Citations

  1. [S135] George Edward Cokayne, Complete peerage, VI p. 676.

Janet Chrichton1

F
     Janet Chrichton was the daughter of Patrick Chrichton of Cranston-Riddel.1 Janet Chrichton married John Douglas, 2nd Earl of Morton before 1493.

Citations

  1. [S135] George Edward Cokayne, Complete peerage, IX p. 288.

Patrick Chrichton of Cranston-Riddel1

M

Child of Patrick Chrichton of Cranston-Riddel

Citations

  1. [S135] George Edward Cokayne, Complete peerage, IX p. 288.

Lord Chancellor William Chrichton, 1st Lord Chrichton1

M

Child of Lord Chancellor William Chrichton, 1st Lord Chrichton

Citations

  1. [S135] George Edward Cokayne, Complete peerage, VI p. 676.

Jean Christie

F, b. circa 1770, d. 27 July 1824
     Jean Christie was born circa 1770.1 She was the daughter of Mrs. Susan Roberstson. Jean Christie married Alexander Gordon 4th Duke of Gordon, 7th Marquess, 1st Earl of Norwich, son of Cosmo George Gordon 3rd Duke of Gordon, 6th Marquess and Lady Katharine Gordon, on 30 July 1820 in Kirk of Fochabers, Bellie, by the Rev. William Rennie.2 Jean Christie died on 27 July 1824 after a severe illness of about twelve months.
s.p. legit.3 She was buried on 2 August 1824 in Bellie Churchyard.2

Children of Jean Christie and Alexander Gordon 4th Duke of Gordon, 7th Marquess, 1st Earl of Norwich

Citations

  1. [S17] John Gask, Les Jumelles and their families, p.18.
  2. [S380] James Frederick Skinner Gordon Lachlan Shaw, The History of the Province of Moray, p. 58.
  3. [S469] Jean Christie and her children, Manuscript notebook, say 1920's unknown repository.
  4. [S91] Www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk, Parish Records Index (1553-1854).

Margaretta Christie

F, b. August 1849, d. 1930
     Margaretta Christie was born in August 1849 in New York.1 She married George Randolf Cony, son of John Randolph Cony and Mary Margaret Sewall.2 Margaretta Christie appears on the census of 1920 at Ho-Ho-Kus, New Jersey, living with her daughter and son-in-law.3 She died in 1930.4

Child of Margaretta Christie and George Randolf Cony

Citations

  1. [S208] 1900 US Census, Hohokus, Bergen, New Jersey.
  2. [S195] Mary Lovering Holman, John Coney of Boston, p. 212 c.f.
  3. [S206] 1920 US Census, Ho-Ho-Kus District 54.
  4. [S392] Website findagrave.com (http://www.findagrave.com/) "# 5719939."

John Barker Church1

M, d. 27 April 1818
     John Barker Church was born on 30 October 1748 in Lowestoft, Suffolk.2 He married Engeltje [Angelica] Schuyler, daughter of General Philip John Schuyler and Catherine Van Rensselaer, in 1777. John Barker Church died on 27 April 1818 in London.3

Citations

  1. [S176] Cuyler Reynolds, Hudson-Mohawk memoirs.
  2. [S468] Wikipedia, online http://en.wikipedia.org, John Barker Church.
  3. [S205] Newspaper, New York Evening Post, 19 June 1818.

Rev. Cameron Churchill B.A., S.C.L.1

M
     Rev. Cameron Churchill B.A., S.C.L. was the son of Rev. William Churchill and Julia Charlotte Mackenzie Gordon.1 Rev. Cameron Churchill B.A., S.C.L. married Eliza Blanche Hodge on 19 November 1874.1

Citations

  1. [S205] Newspaper, Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser, 25 November 1874.

Edith Mary Preston (May) Churchill1,2

F, b. December 1873, d. 15 February 1967
     Edith Mary Preston (May) Churchill's birth was registered in the quarter ending December 1873 in the New Forest, Hampshire registration district; (the 1881 Census gives her birth place as Woodlands, Hants.)1,3 She was the daughter of Vice-Admiral Orford Churchill R.N. and Edith Maria Preston. Edith Mary Preston (May) Churchill married Brigadier General Jonathan William Shirley Sewell C.B., C.M.G., son of Rev. Henry Doyle Sewell M.A. and Edith Pierce Morgan, on 29 January 1896 in St. Mary's, Alverstoke, Hampshire.2 Edith Mary Preston (May) Churchill died on 15 February 1967 in Tunbridge Wells, Kent, at the age of 93 Obituary notice reads: Sewell - On Feb 15, 1967, at Tunbridge Wells, Edith Mary Preston, in her 93rd year, widow of Brig.-General J.W.S. Sewell, CB., CMG., and mother of Stephen Sewell.

Child of Edith Mary Preston (May) Churchill and Brigadier General Jonathan William Shirley Sewell C.B., C.M.G.

Citations

  1. [S120] Free BMD.
  2. [S117] The Times Newspaper, Jan 31, 1896.
  3. [S50] British Census 1881.

Sub-Lt. John Preston Churchill1

M, b. December 1883, d. 18 March 1904
     Sub-Lt. John Preston Churchill's birth was registered in the quarter ending December 1883 in the Dorchester, Dorset registration district.1 He was the son of Vice-Admiral Orford Churchill R.N. and Edith Maria Preston.1 John Churchil became a midshipman on 15 January 1899, and was promoted to be a sub-lieutenant on 15 September 1902. He held first class certificates in seamanship, navigation, pilotage, gunnery, and torpedo and his commission in the Thames "for course of instruction in submarine boats bore date of 1 January [1904].2 Sub-Lt. John Preston Churchill drowned on 18 March 1904 off the Nab at the age of 20 taking part in fleet excercises with Submarine HMS/M A1 which was run down and sunk by the SS Berwick Castle at about 3 p.m., a total of eleven people lost their lives. He has the unenviable title of being the first of his rank to die in a submarine.1,2

Citations

  1. [S120] Free BMD.
  2. [S117] The Times Newspaper, 19 March 1904.

Vice-Admiral Orford Churchill R.N.1

M, b. December 1842, d. 1 December 1909
     Vice-Admiral Orford Churchill R.N. was born in December 1842.2 He was the son of Rev. William Churchill and Julia Charlotte Mackenzie Gordon.2 The marriage of Vice-Admiral Orford Churchill R.N. and Edith Maria Preston was registered in the quarter ending December 1872 in the New Forest registration district.3 Vice-Admiral Orford Churchill R.N. died on 1 December 1909 whilst staying at The Rectory, Berrynarbor, Devon, he died from heart failure whilst being helped on with his coat at a shooting party.2

He entered the Navy in 1857. He was made a commander in 1879, a captain in 1887 and retired in 1897, attaining his flag rank on the Retired List. He was a nautical assessor for the hearing of Admiralty appeals in the House of Lords and a Justice of the Peace for Huntingdonshire.2

Children of Vice-Admiral Orford Churchill R.N. and Edith Maria Preston

Citations

  1. [S117] The Times Newspaper, Jan 31, 1896.
  2. [S117] The Times Newspaper, 3 December 1909.
  3. [S120] Free BMD.

Randolph Henry Spencer Churchill1

M
     Randolph Henry Spencer Churchill married Jennie Jerome (Lady Randolph CHURCHILL), daughter of Leonard Jerome, on 15 April 1874 in British Embassy, Paris.1

Citations

  1. [S21] Various editors, Dictionary of National Biography.

Rev. W.R.H. Churchill

M

Child of Rev. W.R.H. Churchill

Rev. William Churchill1

M
     Rev. William Churchill was the son of Rev. W.R.H. Churchill. Rector of Strickland. Rev. William Churchill married Julia Charlotte Mackenzie Gordon, daughter of Sir Orford Gordon bart., on 5 December 1839 in Walcot Church, Bath.1,2

Children of Rev. William Churchill and Julia Charlotte Mackenzie Gordon

Citations

  1. [S117] The Times Newspaper, 3 December 1909.
  2. [S205] Newspaper, Hampshire Telegraph and Sussex Chronicle etc (Portsmouth, England), Monday, December 9, 1839.
  3. [S205] Newspaper, Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser, 25 November 1874.

Roger Comte de Château-Porcien1

M
     Roger Comte de Château-Porcien married Ermengarde (Unknown).1

Child of Roger Comte de Château-Porcien and Ermengarde (Unknown)

Citations

  1. [S406] Charles Cawley, Medieval Lands, Namur (as at October 2007).

Elizabeth Ann Cilley1

F, b. 1804, d. 1876
     Elizabeth Ann Cilley was born in 1804.1 She was the daughter of Major Greenleaf Cilley and Jennie Neally.1 Elizabeth Ann Cilley married Capt. Benjamin Burley in 1826.1 Elizabeth Ann Cilley died in 1876.1

Child of Elizabeth Ann Cilley and Capt. Benjamin Burley

Citations

  1. [S189] Frederick A. Virkus, Abridged Compendium of American Genealogy, Vol. 7 p. 514.
  2. [S189] Frederick A. Virkus, Abridged Compendium of American Genealogy, Vol. 7 p. 515.

Major Greenleaf Cilley1

M, b. 1767, d. 1808
     Major Greenleaf Cilley was born in 1767.1 He was the son of Gen. Joseph Cilley and Sarah Longfellow.1 Major Greenleaf Cilley married Jennie Neally in 1788.1 Major Greenleaf Cilley died in 1808.1

Child of Major Greenleaf Cilley and Jennie Neally

Citations

  1. [S189] Frederick A. Virkus, Abridged Compendium of American Genealogy, Vol. 7 p. 514.

Gen. Joseph Cilley1

M, b. 1734, d. 1799
     Gen. Joseph Cilley was born in 1734.1 He married Sarah Longfellow, daughter of Judge Jonathan Longfellow and Mercy Clark, in 1756.1 Gen. Joseph Cilley died in 1799.1

Child of Gen. Joseph Cilley and Sarah Longfellow

Citations

  1. [S189] Frederick A. Virkus, Abridged Compendium of American Genealogy, Vol. 7 p. 514.