Sophia Sewell1

F, b. 6 February 1808, d. 17 September 1828
     Sophia Sewell was born on 6 February 1808.1 She was the daughter of Stephen Sewell K.C. and Jane Caldwell.1 Sophia Sewell was baptised on 3 March 1808 at Christ Church Cathedral, Montréal.2 She died on 17 September 1828 in Montréal at the age of 20.3 She was buried on 20 September 1828 in Montréal.3

Citations

  1. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.
  2. [S232] Ancestry.com, Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967. Montréal (Anglican Christ Church Cathedral, Actes), 1808.
  3. [S232] Ancestry.com, Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967. Montréal (Anglican Christ Church Cathedral, Actes), 1828.

Sophie Janet Sewell1

F, b. 4 May 1846, d. 4 April 1891
     Sophie Janet Sewell was born on 4 May 1846 in Québec.1 She was the daughter of Sheriff William Smith Sewell and Lavinia Marian Griffin.2 Sophie Janet Sewell was baptised on 18 May 1846 at Chapel of the Holy Trinity, Québec, privately by E.W. Sewell.1 She having been previously baptised was received into the church on 12 June 1848 at Québec.3 She married Capt. Joseph Fleming on 3 June 1869 in Québec the groom is called "of Dublin" in the record of the marriage.2,4 Sophie Janet Sewell was enumerated in the Census of 1881 in Montcalm Ward, Québec, with her two children and one servant.5 She died on 4 April 1891 at the age of 44.6 She was buried on 6 April 1891 in Mount Hermon Cemetery, the funeral cortege from 39 Julia Street to St. Matthew's Church.7,6

Children of Sophie Janet Sewell and Capt. Joseph Fleming

Citations

  1. [S232] Ancestry.com, Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967. Québec (Anglican) (Québec (Anglican Cathedral Holy Trinity church)), 1846.
  2. [S2] Ancestor of J.E. McClellan, McClellan Family Tree.
  3. [S232] Ancestry.com, Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967. Québec (Anglican) (Québec (Anglican Cathedral Holy Trinity church)), 1848.
  4. [S232] Ancestry.com, Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967. Québec (Anglican) (Québec (Anglican Cathedral Holy Trinity church)), 1869.
  5. [S110] 1881 Canadian Census.
  6. [S522] Gordon A. Morley and William J. Park, Mount Hermon Cemetery, H357.
  7. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.

Stephen Sewell1

M, b. 25 January 1844, d. 8 January 1848
     Stephen Sewell was born on 25 January 1844 in Montréal.1 He was the son of Dr. Stephen Charles Sewell MD, LRCS and Isabella Geddes.1 Stephen Sewell was baptised on 25 February 1844 at Christ Church Cathedral, Montréal.1 He died on 8 January 1848 in Montréal at the age of 3.2 He was buried on 13 January 1848 in Montréal.2

Citations

  1. [S232] Ancestry.com, Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967. Montréal (Anglican Christ Church Cathedral, Actes), 1844.
  2. [S232] Ancestry.com, Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967. Montréal (Anglican Christ Church Cathedral, Actes), 1848.

Dr. Stephen Charles Sewell MD, LRCS

M, b. 1 July 1814, d. 1865
     Dr. Stephen Charles Sewell MD, LRCS was born on 1 July 1814 in Montréal.1 He was the son of Stephen Sewell K.C. and Jane Caldwell.2 Dr. Stephen Charles Sewell MD, LRCS was baptised on 7 August 1814 at Christ Church Cathedral, Montréal.1 He graduated from Edinburgh in medicine, his dissertation was on intermittent fever. He graduated at the same time as his brother Edward. He married Isabella Geddes, daughter of Dr. James Geddes and Sarah Hannah Boies, on 8 July 1840 in the residence of Charles Geddes, St. James Place, Montréal, the marriage bond is dated 3 July 1840. They had several children all of whom died s.p.3,4 On 16 November 1844 he was installed in the Grand Lodge of the Odd Fellowship in Montreal. Dr. Stephen Charles Sewell MD, LRCS died in 1865 in Bytown, Ottawa.

THE LATE S. C. SEWELL, M.D., L.R.C.S., Edin.
It is with deep regret, and sympathy for his afflicted widow, that we announce the death of Stephen Charles Sewell, M.D., &c., which lamentable event took place at his residence, in Ottawa City, C.W. Dr. Sewell was a son of the late Solicitor General for the Lower Province, and nephew of the late Chief Justice Sewell, of Quebec. He studied in Edinburgh, and during his pupilage was elected President of the Royal Medical Society of that city. He commenced practice in Montreal about the year 1836 or 1837. In 1842 he was elected Lecturer on Materia Medica McGill University, and Attending Physician Montreal General Hospital, which posts he held up to the year 1848, when he resigned, and left our city. In 1850, on his return to Montreal, he again became attached to the faculty of Medicine McGill College, and to the Staff of the Hospital, and lectured on Clinical Medicine up to the year 1852, when he removed to Ottawa.

Dr. Sewell has contributed several papers of value to medical periodicals, and in the pages of our Journal he published, from time to time, the results of his observations. In manner he was kind and affable; as a lecturer he was clear and painstaking. His views on medicine were sound; and though perhaps not brilliant as a teacher, yet he possessed that gentlemanly deportment which endeared him to his pupils. As a practitioner, be possessed a pleasing manner which inspired confidence. His death, though not sudden, was unexpected. Although his health had been failing for several years past, yet no serious apprehensions were entertained of a fatal result, until about a week before the event. Canada Medical Journal and Monthly Record, Volume 2, p. 334.

Children of Dr. Stephen Charles Sewell MD, LRCS and Isabella Geddes

Citations

  1. [S232] Ancestry.com, Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967. Montréal (Anglican Christ Church Cathedral, Actes), 1814.
  2. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.
  3. [S79] Edward Marion Chadwick, Ontarian Families, Vol. II p. 85.
  4. [S232] Ancestry.com, Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967. Montréal (Anglican Christ Church Cathedral,Actes), 1840.
  5. [S232] Ancestry.com, Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967. Montréal (Anglican Christ Church Cathedral,Actes), 1841.
  6. [S232] Ancestry.com, Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967. Montréal (Anglican Christ Church Cathedral, Actes), 1842.
  7. [S232] Ancestry.com, Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967. Montréal (Anglican Christ Church Cathedral, Actes), 1844.
  8. [S232] Ancestry.com, Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967. Montréal (Anglican Christ Church Cathedral, Actes), 1845.
  9. [S232] Ancestry.com, Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967. Montréal (Anglican Christ Church Cathedral, Actes), 1847.
  10. [S232] Ancestry.com, Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967. Lennoxville (Church of England), 1849.
  11. [S232] Ancestry.com, Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967. Montréal (Anglican Christ Church Cathedral, Actes), 1851.

Stephen Sewell K.C.1

M, b. circa 25 May 1770, d. 21 June 1832
     Stephen Sewell K.C. was born circa 25 May 1770 in Cambridge, Massachusetts.2 He was the son of Jonathan/2 Sewell and Esther Quincy.1 Stephen Sewell K.C. married Jane Caldwell, daughter of James Caldwell and Elizabeth Barnes, on 18 June 1801 in Christ Church, Montréal.3

The younger son of a prominent loyalist who was the last British attorney general of Massachusetts, Stephen Sewall was only five when his family emigrated to England at the beginning of the War of American Independence. In 1778 the Sewells settled in Bristol, where Stephen attended grammar school and at home absorbed his parents' fear of democracy and their fervent desire that he and his elder brother, Jonathan, recoup what the family had lost in America.

In 1787 Stephen and his parents recrossed the ocean to join Jonathan, who had earlier immigrated to Saint John, New Brunswick. Stephen followed his brother into the legal office of Ward Chipman, and was called to the New Brunswick bar in 1791. Like Jonathan before him, he decided – later that year – to seek his fortune in the larger colony of Lower Canada, whose governor was Lord Dorchester (Guy Carleton), patron of the loyalists. This decision evinced a permanent character trait: the desire to model his career after that of his elder brother. To the latter he had confessed in 1790, "It has been always my ambition to follow as nearly in your footsteps as I was capable and beleive me it always will be."

After obtaining his commission as a lawyer on 16 Dec. 1791, Sewell established himself in Montreal and began the pursuit of clients, who would soon include many of the leading merchants and wealthier seigneurs. By 1805 he had one of the most flourishing practices in the city, and from it he reputedly drew between £600 and £800 a year. He was less fortunate in his many business investments, among them the Company of Proprietors of the Montreal Water Works, at least one high-risk venture to the West Indies in 1816–17, and extensive speculation in real estate in Lower Canada; he acquired 1,000 acres of land in Grenville Township in 1797, was granted 3,200 acres in Hemmingford Township in 1811, and owned land in Montreal.

Sewell was a staunch adherent of the English party in Lower Canada, and his most notable enthusiasm was ferreting out spies and revolutionaries. Like many others of his party during the wars against revolutionary France, he was convinced that at the appearance of even the smallest French force the Canadians would rise in arms and massacre the British minority. In the aftermath of riots against militia service in 1794 he was one of the organizers of cartridge making and other preparations to defend Montreal against what proved to be a phantom horde of armed habitants. During disturbances protesting the road act of 1796 Sewell believed the story of Montreal tavern-keeper Elmer Cushing that Citizen Pierre-Auguste Adet, the French minister to the United States, had come in person to Montreal to hatch a "plan for the extirpation of the English." With more reason he accepted his informer's claim that one of Adet's agents had attempted to recruit a fifth column. Sewell hurried Cushing down to Quebec to see his brother, then attorney general. Promised an entire township for his evidence, Cushing swore a deposition describing the activities of the agent, David McLane. McLane was arrested in the capital in May 1797, convicted of treason in July, and on the 21st of that month hanged, beheaded, and disembowelled as an example to others.

Sewell remained nervous and alert throughout the Napoleonic period. In 1801 he convinced himself that the parish priests north of Montreal were conspiring to aid a leader of the Canadian party in the House of Assembly, Joseph Papineau, in his determination "to (be) a Buoniparte in this province." A series of fires in the city during the summer of 1803 was put down to the "great design which the Emissaries of France have on this Country," Sewell having earlier decided that Napoleon would "make every possible Exertion to land troops in the Province" and that "the Canadians will join them in numbers." "Heaven only knows," he concluded, "if we do not stand On the brink of destruction." In 1801, and again during a political crisis in 1810, he employed a Canadian informer to report on disloyalty among the captains of militia. Sewell himself joined Montreal's 1st Militia Battalion, a British unit, as an ensign about 1803; he became a captain in 1812. An attempt in 1814 by Canadian lawyers to establish an advocates' society – which Sewell helped to abort– was characteristically interpreted as the work of "Jacobins." Sewell made sure that Jonathan and, through him, the governor were kept informed of his activities, for visible loyalty was a common route to the government posts he coveted.

Sewell's longstanding efforts, and those of his brother, who became chief justice in 1808, succeeded the following year when he was named by Governor Craig to replace James Stuart, recently dismissed for political unreliability, as solicitor general of Lower Canada; the office was worth about £1,700 a year in salary and fees. In November 1809 Sewell won a seat in the House of Assembly for Huntingdon County along with a leader of the Canadian party, Jean-Antoine Panet. The contest had been hotly disputed: after 15 days of polling Panet obtained 897 votes to Sewell's 895, and the loser, Augustin Cuvillier, protested Sewell's election in February 1810. However, Craig dissolved the legislature on 1 March, and in the subsequent elections Sewell was returned along with Joseph Papineau in Montreal East, Stuart being a defeated candidate. Like many others of his circle, Sewell thought Craig's imprisonment of certain Canadian political leaders in March – the so-called Reign of Terror – an heroic and infinitely wise act of statesmanship, but he was soon disappointed to learn that the imperial authority had quietly repudiated any further aggressive actions, including enforcement of claims to royal supremacy over the Roman Catholic Church and a proposed suspension of the constitution. As usual Sewell and his friends proved to be more imperialist than the imperial government.

In 1811 Craig was replaced by Sir George Prevost, who, requiring the support of the population as war with the United States loomed, adopted a conciliatory policy towards Canadian leaders. Sewell and his colleagues in the English party were outraged by the resulting deprivation of influence and patronage they suffered. They responded in part with a series of vitriolic letters to the Montreal Herald in 1814–15 attacking Prevost's civil and military administration. The most damning letters, signed Veritas, attributed the British retreats from Sackets Harbor, N.Y., in 1813 and Plattsburgh in 1814 to cowardice and stupidity on Prevost's part. Suspicious, despite Sewell's denials that he had authored the letters, the governor cleverly ordered him to prosecute the printer and the editor of the Montreal Herald for criminal libel. The editor, Mungo Kay, thereupon revealed that Sewell had written and brought to him in great secrecy an unsigned article entitled "Particulars of the late disastrous affair on Lake Champlain," which was published shortly after the Plattsburgh débâcle. Sewell admitted authorship but asserted that the piece was simply a review of the facts. Although the article was less explicitly critical than the polemics of Veritas, its conclusion left little doubt about what the writer thought of Prevost's strategy. "A few minutes more would have given up the fortifications . . . into our hands, and every American must have fallen, or been made prisoner," he wrote. Instead, "it was thought necessary to check the ardor of the troops" and control of the lake was lost. Sewell was suspended from office immediately, and in July 1816 he was dismissed by Governor Sir John Coape Sherbrooke following a report on the matter by the Executive Council.

Thereafter a great deal of Sewell's energy was expended in seeking rehabilitation. The chief justice operated under a standing injunction to work for his brother's interest whenever an office remotely suitable became vacant and to work fast, since, as Stephen put it in 1825, "there is no time ever to be lost in looking after Appointments." Jonathan pleaded with Governor Lord Dalhousie (Ramsay) to restore the office of solicitor general to his brother, but to no avail. Nor could he, despite repeated attempts, satisfy Stephen's most cherished ambition, which was to follow him to the bench. The chief justice seems, however, to have been able to influence the granting of some minor posts and honours. In any case Sewell was named secretary to boundary commissioner John Ogilvy (1817), a warden of the House of Industry in Montreal (1818), a commissioner for the repair of the Montreal prison (1819), and a commissioner for the construction of the Lachine Canal (1821).

As secretary to Ogilvy, Sewell kept a journal of the boundary commission's work between May and September 1817 along the St Lawrence River from Saint-Régis to Cornwall, Upper Canada. In it he recorded meteorological observations and commented on geological structures, soil conditions, flora, and fauna. He also had a clear eye for revealing details of social life. Thus he remarked that Highland settlers made poor farmers but good militiamen, that it was the women who ran the farms – "in fact they are the supports of their husbands and families" – and that their daughters furnished Montreal with servants. He saw that "the manners of the St Regis Indians are fast changing to European their dress resembles the Canadians." Although the immigrants who passed by in bateau loads on the St Lawrence on their way to Upper Canada were not dressed in rags, there was an "appearance of great want amongst them," and he noted that "they frequently lament having quitted their own country." Their plight touched him, and he found it "a subject of great regret that Government in times of such extreme pressure should have deemed it proper to deprive the new settlers of their rations." He was also highly attentive to economic trends as trade with Upper Canada expanded and the machine age dawned in the colonies. Thus, he observed that Lower Canadian villages such as Vaudreuil, Les Cèdres, and Coteau-du-Lac could be developed around mills and factories using water-driven machinery, and that transportation procedures could be made more efficient on the heavily used section of the St Lawrence between Cornwall and Montreal.

In Montreal Sewell was active in community affairs. Early in the century he served on a committee for the erection of Christ Church. In 1820 he acted as the senior attorney of the Royal Institution for the Advancement of Learning to negotiate the transfer from James McGill's estate of the Burnside property on which McGill College was to be built. He was a principal founder seven years later of the Natural History Society of Montreal, of which he became president. In 1828 he was among the founders of a lawyers' library, which became the Advocates' Library and Law Institute of Montreal in 1830 and ultimately the Montreal bar library; he also served as the library's first president.

As a lawyer Sewell could not equal his brother's ability to go quickly to the nub of a complicated legal problem or to ground a conclusion in general principle as well as precedent. He was able, however, to weigh both sides of a case intelligently; he prepared thoroughly and was well read in both the common and the civil law systems. Sherbrooke's unfavourable opinion of Sewell's capacities at the time of his dismissal can probably be discounted; the lawyer's clientele suggests high competence, and La Minerve, which was hardly sympathetic politically, observed after his death that his "knowledge of law made him one of our leading jurists." In 1827 Dalhousie had appointed him a king's counsel. His talent as a lawyer and his loyalty were much in demand in the spring of 1832 following an election riot in Montreal West during which regular troops had fired on a crowd, killing three Canadians. He acted as legal adviser to the commanding officers, Lieutenant-Colonel Alexander Fisher MacIntosh and Captain Henry Temple, and in his capacity as king's counsel and doyen of the Montreal bar he later assisted in the deliberations of the Court of King's Bench that resulted in the freeing of the two officers, an outcome ardently desired by Governor Lord Aylmer (Whitworth-Aylmer).

Sewell had less than three weeks to congratulate himself and imagine the favours soon to flow from government. In the early morning of 21 June he was struck down by cholera, and he died a few hours later. He left a comfortable home as well as moveable property valued at nearly £600. The library of more than 900 volumes alone was worth £215. His properties included a farm and lot in the seigneury of Prairie-de-la-Madeleine and 3,400 acres of township lands. However, unfortunate investments had continued to sink him in financial difficulties, and after 1817 he had avoided bankruptcy only through the generosity of his brother; in October 1832 his debts totalled £7,256, of which nearly £3,000 was owed to Jonathan. The estate was insolvent; his widow, Jane, and their six children, of whom two were minors, were obliged to renounce it. F. Murray Greenwood in Dictionary of Canadian Biography.2

Stephen Sewell K.C. was author of Particulars of the late disastrous affair on Lake Champlain, published in the Montreal Herald, 17 Sept. 1814. He may also have written The letters of Veritas, re-published from the "Montreal Herald"; containing a succinct narrative of the military administration of Sir George Prevost, during his command in the Canadas . . . (Montreal, 1815), but this pamphlet may have been the work of John Richardson, as Henry Scadding asserts in Some Canadian noms-de-plume identified: with samples of the writings to which they are appended, Canadian Journal (Toronto), new ser., 15 (1876–78): 332–41.2

Children of Stephen Sewell K.C. and Jane Caldwell

Citations

  1. [S2] Ancestor of J.E. McClellan, McClellan Family Tree.
  2. [S58] Various Editors, Dictionary of Canadian Biography.
  3. [S232] Ancestry.com, Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967.Montréal (Anglican Christ Church Cathedral,Actes), 1801.
  4. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.

Stephen St. Alban Sewell Jr.1

M, b. 13 September 1896, d. 1963
     Stephen St. Alban Sewell Jr. was born on 13 September 1896 in Ontario.2 He was the son of Stephen St. Albans Sewell and Clara Priscilla Lepper.1 Stephen St. Alban Sewell Jr. married Alison Bernard Earle Walker on 5 June 1929 in Westmount, Québec.3 In 1933 Stephen St. Alban Sewell Jr. and Alison Bernard Earle Walker was living at 3255 Cedar Avenue, Montréal.4 Stephen St. Alban Sewell Jr. died in 1963.1

Citations

  1. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.
  2. [S226] 1901 Canadian Census.
  3. [S232] Ancestry.com, Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967. Westmount (United Church, Melville), 1929.
  4. [S232] Ancestry.com, Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967. Montréal (Anglican Christ Church Cathedral, Actes), 1933.

Stephen St. Albans Sewell

M, b. 14 March 1861, d. 15 August 1949
     Stephen St. Albans Sewell. Accountant.1 He was born on 14 March 1861 in Toronto.2 He was the son of Robert Shore Milnes Sewell and Louisa F. Wicksteed.2 Stephen St. Albans Sewell was living in 96 Spencer Avenue, Toronto.2 He married Clara Priscilla Lepper, daughter of Mathew Lepper and Jane (Unknown), on 12 January 1888 in Trinity Church, Aurora, York, Ontario.1 Stephen St. Albans Sewell died on 15 August 1949 in Bethasda Hospital, Lansing, Michigan, at the age of 88.2 He was buried St. James Cemetery after a service at St. Mark's Church.2

Children of Stephen St. Albans Sewell and Clara Priscilla Lepper

Citations

  1. [S232] Ancestry.com, Ontario, Canada Marriages, 1857-1922.
  2. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.
  3. [S232] Ancestry.com, Ontario, Canada Deaths, 1869-1934, York, 1924.
  4. [S226] 1901 Canadian Census.

Stephen William Sewell

M, b. 18 September 1833, d. 2 April 1861
     Stephen William Sewell was born on 18 September 1833 in Québec.1,2 He was the son of Col. John Saint Alban Sewell and Margaret Hobbs.3 Stephen William Sewell was baptised on 29 November 1833 at Québec.2 On 9 November 1855 he was commissioned into the 86th Regiment of Foot (Royal County Down), appointed Lieutenant (without purchase) in the 97th Foot. He served in Central India under Sir Hugh Rose, and was present at the siege, storm and capture of Chandaree, the battle of Betwa River (31 March 1858), he was severely wounded on 3 April 1858 in the final attack on the breach in the walls of Jhansi. He was mentioned in despatches for his bravery and conduct in the siege.
His name appears in the The Indian Mutiny Medal Roll (British Forces) 1857-1859 as being in the 86th Foot though Roy has him in the 88th Foot. In fact he transferred on exchange with a Lt. Joshua Bowness from the 86th to 89th Foot with effect from 30 May 1859. His entire service was in India.4,5,6 He died on 2 April 1861 in Allahabad, India, at the age of 27 following a fall from a horse whilst steeple chasing. Roy calls the town "Amullabad."7

Citations

  1. [S378] Pierre-Georges Roy, Fils de Québec, quatrième série, p. 131.
  2. [S232] Ancestry.com, Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967. Québec (Anglican) (Québec (Anglican Cathedral Holy Trinity church)), 1833.
  3. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.
  4. [S134] H.G. Hart, Army List, 1860, p. 326.
  5. [S378] Pierre-Georges Roy, Fils de Québec, quatrième série, p. 131-132.
  6. [S205] Newspaper, Morning Post, 10 Nov 1855.
  7. [S378] Pierre-Georges Roy, Fils de Québec, quatrième série, p. 132.

Susan Georgina Sewell1

F, b. 18 May 1830, d. 18 May 1830
     Susan Georgina Sewell was born on 18 May 1830.2 She was baptised on 18 May 1830 at Chapel of the Holy Trinity privately by her father the Rev. E.W. Sewell.1 She was the daughter of Rev. Edmund Willoughby Sewell and Susan Stewart.2 Susan Georgina Sewell was buried on 19 May 1830 in Québec.1 She died on 18 May 1830 in Québec.1

Citations

  1. [S232] Ancestry.com, Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967. Québec (Anglican) (Québec (Anglican Cathedral Holy Trinity church)), 1830.
  2. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.

Susan Hayden Sewell1

F, b. 7 July 1847, d. 9 January 1848
     Susan Hayden Sewell was born on 7 July 1847 in Montréal.1 She was the daughter of Dr. Stephen Charles Sewell MD, LRCS and Isabella Geddes.1 Susan Hayden Sewell was baptised on 8 August 1847 at Christ Church Cathedral, Montréal, This baptism took place at the same time as that for Sophia Mann Durnford.1 She died on 9 January 1848.2 She was buried on 13 January 1848 in Montréal.2

Citations

  1. [S232] Ancestry.com, Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967. Montréal (Anglican Christ Church Cathedral, Actes), 1847.
  2. [S232] Ancestry.com, Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967. Montréal (Anglican Christ Church Cathedral, Actes), 1848.

Thomas Joseph Sewell1

M, b. 7 March 1938, d. 12 July 1958
     Thomas Joseph Sewell was born on 7 March 1938 in California.2 He was the son of Willoughby de Quincy Sewell and Helen C. Haloran.1 Thomas Joseph Sewell died on 12 July 1958 in San Bernardino, California, at the age of 20 possibly killed in a motor accident.2

Citations

  1. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.
  2. [S232] Ancestry.com, California Death Index, 1940-1997.

Virginia Edwina Sewell1

F, b. 16 March 1913, d. 1 April 2008
     Virginia Edwina Sewell was born on 16 March 1913 in East Lebanon, Maine.1 She was the daughter of Edward Leveson Sewell and Ruth Emily Lord.1 Virginia Edwina Sewell died on 1 April 2008 in Dover, New Hampshire, at the age of 952 and is buried in Pine Hill Cemetery, New Hampshire.3

Child of Virginia Edwina Sewell

Citations

  1. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.
  2. [S210] Social Security Death Index.
  3. [S392] Website findagrave.com (http://www.findagrave.com/) "# 88058975."

Virginia Sewallis Sewell1

F, b. December 1886, d. September 1887
     Virginia Sewallis Sewell's birth was registered in the quarter ending December 1886 in the Strood, Kent registration district.1 She was the daughter of Sewallis Arthur Sewell and Cecilia Hara Dotiani Noris.1 Virginia's death was registered in the quarter ending September 1887 in the Guildford, Surrey registration district.1

Citations

  1. [S120] Free BMD.

William Caldwell Sewell1

M, b. 27 May 1818, d. 21 July 1819
     William Caldwell Sewell was born on 27 May 1818.1 He was the son of Stephen Sewell K.C. and Jane Caldwell.1 William Caldwell Sewell was baptised on 14 September 1818 at Christ Church Cathedral, Montréal.2 He died on 21 July 1819 at the age of 1.1

Citations

  1. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.
  2. [S232] Ancestry.com, Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967. Montréal (Anglican Christ Church Cathedral, Actes), 1818.

William Caldwell Sewell1

M, b. 6 November 1845, d. 5 May 1847
     William Caldwell Sewell was born on 6 November 1845.1 He was the son of Dr. Stephen Charles Sewell MD, LRCS and Isabella Geddes.1 William Caldwell Sewell was baptised on 7 December 1845 at Christ Church Cathedral, Montréal, this baptism took place at the same time as that of Philip Walker Durnford.1 He died on 5 May 1847 in Montréal at the age of 1.2

Citations

  1. [S232] Ancestry.com, Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967. Montréal (Anglican Christ Church Cathedral, Actes), 1845.
  2. [S232] Ancestry.com, Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967. Montréal, Anglican Christ Church Cathedral, 1847.

William Cullen Sewell1

M, b. 21 June 1929, d. 15 October 1983
     William Cullen Sewell was born on 21 June 1929 in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin.1 He was the son of William Frederick Sewell and Mabel Inez McKnight.1 William Cullen Sewell died on 15 October 1983 in Provincetown, Massachusetts, at the age of 54.2

Citations

  1. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.
  2. [S232] Ancestry.com, Massachusetts Death Index, 1970-2003.

William Edwards Sewell1

M, b. 22 April 1859, d. 14 November 1911
     William Edwards Sewell was born on 22 April 1859 in Houghton, Michigan.1 He was the son of Frederick George Sewell and Jane Edwards.1 William Edwards Sewell married Sara Collins Owens, daughter of George Owens and Mary Collins, on 23 November 1887 in Lake Linden, Houghton, Michigan.2 He was a Captain of a boat on the Great Lakes.1 William Edwards Sewell died on 14 November 1911 in Houghton at the age of 52.1 He was buried in Forest Hill Cemetery, Houghton.1

Children of William Edwards Sewell and Sara Collins Owens

Citations

  1. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.
  2. [S89] Family Search, Michigan Marriages, 1868-1925.

William Frederick Sewell1

M, b. 20 August 1899, d. 2 November 1984
     William Frederick Sewell was born on 20 August 1899 in Portage Twp, Houghton, Michigan.2 He was the son of William Edwards Sewell and Sara Collins Owens.1 He was a an electrician at Giddings & Lewis machine shop.1 William Frederick Sewell married Mabel Inez McKnight, daughter of John McKnight and Matilda Holterman, on 26 December 1923 in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin.1 William Frederick Sewell died on 2 November 1984 in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, at the age of 85.3

Child of William Frederick Sewell and Mabel Inez McKnight

Citations

  1. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.
  2. [S232] Ancestry.com, Michigan, Births and Christenings Index, 1867-1911.
  3. [S89] Family Search, Wisconsin, Death Index, 1959-1997.

William George Grant Sewell1,2

M, b. 24 April 1829, d. 9 August 1862
     William George Grant Sewell was born on 24 April 1829 in Québec.3,4 He was the son of Sheriff William Smith Sewell and Mary Isabella Smith.1 William George Grant Sewell was baptised on 24 June 1829 at Québec.4 He died on 9 August 1862 in Québec at the age of 33 of tuberculosis. He was unmarried.5,6,7,8 He was buried on 11 August 1862 in Mount Hermon Cemetery, Q279, Sillery, Québec.7,8

Died at Quebec on the 8th of August, William Grant Sewell.
Mr. Sewell was born at Quebec, in 1829, and was educated for the bar. His grandfather, the late Jonathan Sewell, had been Chief Justice of Lower Canada. In the year 1853, he came to this city, and adopted journalism as his profession. He became translator and law reporter for the Herald, and discharged the duties of those posts with ability. Some six years since he left this paper and joined the editorial staff of the Times, remaining connected with that journal until January last, when his health compelled him to abandon work and go home to die. Four years ago he was attacked with tubercular consumption. Such was the strength of his constitution, and so vigorously did he struggle against the advances of the disease, that it was not until within a few months that his friends abandoned hope of his recovery. By the advice of his physician, he spent three winters in the west Indies, and beguiled his leisure by writing his "Orderly of Free Labour in the British West Indies," by far the best book which has appeared on the subject of emancipation - a work so dispassionately and honestly written, that both pro and anti-slavery partisans have claimed the author as an ally, and both have drawn largely from its pages for arguments in the slavery controversy. His death has deprived the New York press of an able, honest, and most industrious member; it has robbed a very large section of journalists of an affectionate, faithful, and whole-souled friend. New York Herald.
We notice with deep regret the death of a young Canadian, who had already made his mark in literature, and who, had he been spared, would have risen very high in the scale of authorship. Of retiring habits, he felt himself unfitted for the rough-and-tumble of a lawyer's career, and his sound judgment, good taste, and excellent education, found apparently their appropriate employment in journalism, and in the more ambitious work which is noticed above. As the Herald says, Mr. Sewell's book on free-labour in the West Indies, - dedicated to Mr. Hincks, who showed great kindness to the invalid author when in the Bahamas, - was written in an eminently philosophic and impartial spirit, but yet with the warmest sympathies for oppressed and down-trodden humanity. It was warmly greeted by the English press, and it is universally regarded as a book having authority - by none more so than those who knew the author and appreciated the soundness of his judgment and the purity of his aspirations. Mr. Sewell was a member of a family noted for its ability, and had he lived, none of them would have risen higher than he. - Globe.

Citations

  1. [S2] Ancestor of J.E. McClellan, McClellan Family Tree.
  2. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.
  3. [S378] Pierre-Georges Roy, Fils de Québec, quatrième série, p. 100.
  4. [S232] Ancestry.com, Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967. Québec (Anglican) (Québec (Anglican Cathedral Holy Trinity church)), 1829.
  5. [S26] Hector Livingston Duff, Sewells in the New World, p.90.
  6. [S378] Pierre-Georges Roy, Fils de Québec, quatrième série, p. 101.
  7. [S232] Ancestry.com, Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967. Québec (Anglican) (Québec (Holy Trinity church)), 1862.
  8. [S522] Gordon A. Morley and William J. Park, Mount Hermon Cemetery, Q279.

William Kenneth Sewell1

M, b. 9 May 1918, d. 28 December 2007
     William Kenneth Sewell was born on 9 May 1918 in Lebanon, York, Maine.2 He was the son of Edward Leveson Sewell and Ruth Emily Lord.1 William Kenneth Sewell died on 28 December 2007 in East Lebanon, York, Maine, at the age of 89.3

Citations

  1. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.
  2. [S232] Ancestry.com, Maine, Birth Records, 1621-1922.
  3. [S210] Social Security Death Index.

Sheriff William Smith Sewell1

M, b. 28 May 1798, d. 1 June 1866
     Sheriff William Smith Sewell was born on 28 May 1798 in Québec City.2 He was the son of Chief Justice Jonathan/3 Sewell and Henrietta Smith. Sheriff William Smith Sewell was baptised on 17 June 1798 at Québec by Salter Jehosaphat Mountain.2 He was appointed on 13 November 1822, Sheriff of the District of Quebec a position he filled for 44 years. He married his first wife Mary Isabella Smith, daughter of Dr. Thomas Smith, on 14 January 1827 in Paddington Church, London, the service was conducted by Rev. John Percival, Minister of Oxford Chapel.3 Sheriff William Smith Sewell married secondly Lavinia Marian Griffin, daughter of Surgeon George Griffin and Mary [Unknown], on 20 February 1843 in St-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Québec, (marriage bond dated 16 February 1843.)4 Sheriff William Smith Sewell died on 1 June 1866 in Québec at the age of 68 of congestion of the lungs.5,6 He was buried on 5 June 1866 in Mount Hermon Cemetery Q-223, Sillery, Québec, by the Rev. Botwood.5,6,7

Children of Sheriff William Smith Sewell and Mary Isabella Smith

Children of Sheriff William Smith Sewell and Lavinia Marian Griffin

Citations

  1. [S133] Robert Sewell, Information from Robert Sewell.
  2. [S232] Ancestry.com, Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967. Québec (Anglican) (Québec (Anglican Cathedral Holy Trinity church)), 1796-1800.
  3. [S205] Newspaper, New-York Spectator, (New York, NY) Friday, March 02, 1827.
  4. [S232] Ancestry.com, Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967. St-Jean-sur-Richelieu, 1843.
  5. [S232] Ancestry.com, Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967. Québec (Anglican) (Québec (Holy Trinity church)), 1866.
  6. [S454] Website Archives nationales du Québec (http://pistard.banq.qc.ca) "Registre d'inhumation du Mount Hermon Cemetery, 1848-1904."
  7. [S522] Gordon A. Morley and William J. Park, Mount Hermon Cemetery, Q279.
  8. [S2] Ancestor of J.E. McClellan, McClellan Family Tree.
  9. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.
  10. [S232] Ancestry.com, Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967. Québec (Anglican) (Québec (Anglican Cathedral Holy Trinity church)) > 1837.

Willoughby de Quincy Sewell1

M, b. 13 February 1835, d. 29 May 1911
Willoughby De Quincy Sewell
taken in London
Willoughby De Quincy Sewell, 1835-1911
     Willoughby de Quincy Sewell was born on 13 February 1835 in Québec.2 He was the son of Rev. Edmund Willoughby Sewell and Susan Stewart.3 Willoughby de Quincy Sewell was baptised on 26 March 1835 at Holy Trinity Church, Québec.2 He appears on the census of 4 April 1881 staying with his friend Rev. James G. Tanner, Vicar of Emmanuel Church, Mill Hill, and his family at 50 Warrington Close, London. He is described in the census as a Lay Curate (O.)1 He died on 29 May 1911 in Québec at the age of 76 at the residence of his cousin Miss Ross on St. Foy Road. He was unmarried.3,4,5 He was buried on 31 May 1911 in Mount Hermon Cemetery, Québec. The funeral was conducted at Trinity Church by Bishop Farrar.4,5

Citations

  1. [S50] British Census 1881.
  2. [S232] Ancestry.com, Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1835.
  3. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.
  4. [S232] Ancestry.com, Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967. Québec (Anglican) (Québec (Holy Trinity church)), 1911.
  5. [S522] Gordon A. Morley and William J. Park, Mount Hermon Cemetery, W42.

Willoughby de Quincy Sewell1

M, b. 15 March 1906, d. 17 November 1938
     Willoughby de Quincy Sewell was born on 15 March 1906 in East Lebanon, Maine.1 He was the son of John Edward Taylor Sewell and Emma Mae Ricker.1 Willoughby de Quincy Sewell married Helen C. Haloran in 1934.1 Willoughby de Quincy Sewell died on 17 November 1938 in Victorville, San Bernardino County, California, at the age of 321 and is buried in Olivewood Cemetery, Riverside, California.2

Child of Willoughby de Quincy Sewell and Helen C. Haloran

Citations

  1. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.
  2. [S392] Website findagrave.com (http://www.findagrave.com/) "# 86287672."

Winfrid Sewell1

M, b. 3 June 1836, d. 16 February 1837
     Winfrid Sewell was born on 3 June 1836 in Québec.2 He was the son of Sheriff William Smith Sewell and Mary Isabella Smith.1 Winfrid Sewell was baptised on 17 July 1836 at Chapel of the Holy Trinity, Québec.2 He died on 16 February 1837 in Québec.3 He was buried on 19 February 1837 in Québec.3

Citations

  1. [S232] Ancestry.com, Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967. Québec (Anglican) (Québec (Anglican Cathedral Holy Trinity church)) > 1837.
  2. [S232] Ancestry.com, Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967. Québec (Anglican) (Québec (Anglican Cathedral Holy Trinity church)), 1836.
  3. [S232] Ancestry.com, Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967. Québec (Anglican) (Québec (Anglican Cathedral Holy Trinity church)), 1837.

Winifred Edith Sewell

F, b. 15 August 1912, d. June 1990
     Winifred Edith Sewell was born on 15 August 1912 in Greenacre, Lower Shiplake, Henley-on-Thames, Oxfordshire.1 She was the daughter of Algernon Percy Sewell and Caroline Winifred "Frieda" Horne. Winifred Edith Sewell married William Edge Marshall, son of Dr. John Willis Marshall and Eva Edge, on 21 September 1935 in Great Chart, Kent.2 Winifred's death was registered in the quarter ending June 1990 in the Ashford, Kent registration district.3

Citations

  1. [S117] The Times Newspaper, Aug 17, 1912.
  2. [S117] The Times Newspaper, Sep 25, 1935.
  3. [S120] Free BMD.

Zébée Edith Sewell

F, b. 18 December 1904, d. 23 December 1995
Zébée Edith Rees (née Sewell)
studio portrait taken in 1968
     Zébée Edith Sewell was born on 18 December 1904 in Lahore Cantonment, Mian Mir, India. She was the daughter of Colonel Evelyn Pierce Sewell C.M.G., D.S.O., M.B., BCh., F.R.C.S. and Zébée Maud Jessie Crombie. Zébée Edith Sewell married Brigadier Vivian Wellesley Rees OBE, son of Dr. Daniel Rees M.A., Ph.D. and Elizabeth (Bessie) Mary Davies, on 17 May 1930 in The Cathedral Church, Portsmouth, Hampshire.1 Zébée Edith Sewell died on 23 December 1995 in Hindhead, Surrey, England, at the age of 91 in a nursing home, Huntington House, of a cerebrovascular accident. Her first stroke had occurred in Folkestone a few months earlier. Funeral at the Parish Church of St. Mary, Chiddingfold, 12 January 1996, where her ashes were subsequently interred.

Citations

  1. [S117] The Times Newspaper, Notice of marriages.

Anna Sexton1

F, b. circa 1857
     Anna Sexton was born circa 1857.1 She married John Edward Fraser, son of Alexander Fraser and Mary Mead Torrance, circa 1880.1

Citations

  1. [S432] Marie Fraser, Communications from Marie Fraser.

John Ponsonby Sexton

M
     He was a Recorder of Montreal.1

Child of John Ponsonby Sexton

Citations

  1. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.

Sophia Ellen Sexton1

F, b. 11 December 1838, d. 4 July 1914
     Sophia Ellen Sexton was born on 11 December 1838.2 She was the daughter of John Ponsonby Sexton.1 Sophia Ellen Sexton married Henry George Sewell, son of Sheriff William Smith Sewell and Mary Isabella Smith, on 17 July 1866 in Montréal.3 Sophia Ellen Sexton died on 4 July 1914 in Santa Monica, California, at the age of 75.4

Children of Sophia Ellen Sexton and Henry George Sewell

Citations

  1. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.
  2. [S226] 1901 Canadian Census.
  3. [S232] Ancestry.com, Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967. Montréal (Anglican Trinity Memorial Chapel), 1866.
  4. [S232] Ancestry.com, California, Death Index, 1940-1997.
  5. [S232] Ancestry.com, Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967. Montréal (Anglican Trinity Memorial Chapel), 1868.
  6. [S232] Ancestry.com, Quebec Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967. Montréal (Anglican Saint Jude), 1880-1881.

Anne Jane Bleecker Seymour

F
     Anne Jane Bleecker Seymour was the daughter of Captain Charles Seymour and Anne Jane Powell.