Sidney Berdoe Jarvis1

M, b. 6 November 1854, d. 2 February 1868
     Sidney Berdoe Jarvis was born on 6 November 1854.1 He was the son of George Murray Jarvis and Elizabeth Arnold Jarvis.1 Sidney Berdoe Jarvis died on 2 February 1868 at the age of 13.1

Citations

  1. [S79] Edward Marion Chadwick, Ontarian Families, Vol. II p. 125.

Stephen Jarvis1

M
     Stephen Jarvis married Amelia Glover.1

Child of Stephen Jarvis and Amelia Glover

Citations

  1. [S58] Various Editors, Dictionary of Canadian Biography, Vol. IX p. 411.

William Jarvis1

M, b. 1756, d. 1817
     William Jarvis was born in 1756 in Stamford, Connecticut.1 He was the son of Samuel Jarvis and Martha Seymour.1 William Jarvis married Hannah Owen Peters, daughter of Rev. Samuel Peters D.D., in 1785.2 William Jarvis died in 1817 in York, Ontario.

William (Mr. Secretary) Jarvis, the founder of the family in Upper Canada. He served as cornet in the first (American) Regiment or Queens Rangers Dragoons under Lieut. Col. John Graves Simcoe; he was wounded at Brandywine. On the withdrawal of the British troops from the American Colonies, he went to England, and took a commission in the Army; in 1792 was appointed Secretary and Registrar of Upper Canada - hence his appellation. He and his family sailed in the troopship Henicker to Sorel, Quebec, and were nearly wrecked. He settled at the new capital, Newark (Niagara-on-the-Lake). He was Grand Master Mason; all the early Masonic warrants in Ontario bear his signature and are known as the "Jarvis Warrants."2

Child of William Jarvis and Hannah Owen Peters

Citations

  1. [S456] [J.H. Beers & Co. ], Biographical record of York, p. 211.
  2. [S487] Herbert George Todd, Armory and Lineages of Canada, p. 57.

Hon. William Jarvis1

M
     Hon. William Jarvis married Mary Pepperrell Sparhawk, daughter of Nathaniel Sparhawk and Elizabeth Bartlett, in March 1808.1

Citations

  1. [S170] Unknown author, Genealogy of the Sparhawk family, p. 34.

William Botsford Jarvis1

M, b. 4 May 1799, d. 26 July 1864
     William Botsford Jarvis. Sheriff of the Home District. He was born on 4 May 1799 in Fredericton, New Brunswick.2 He was the son of Stephen Jarvis and Amelia Glover.2 William Botsford Jarvis married Mary Boyles Powell, daughter of William Dummer Powell and Sarah Stevenson, on 22 November 1828 in York at the residence of Samuel P. Jarvis.2 William Botsford Jarvis died on 26 July 1864 in Toronto, Canada West, at the age of 65.2

Children of William Botsford Jarvis and Mary Boyles Powell

Citations

  1. [S82] John Bernard Burke, Colonial Gentry, p. 635.
  2. [S58] Various Editors, Dictionary of Canadian Biography, Vol. IX p. 411.
  3. [S79] Edward Marion Chadwick, Ontarian Families, Vol. II p. 126.
  4. [S79] Edward Marion Chadwick, Ontarian Families, Vol. II p. 134.

William Dummer Jarvis1

M, b. 4 August 1834
     William Dummer Jarvis was born on 4 August 1834.1 He was the son of William Botsford Jarvis and Mary Boyles Powell.1 He was a lieutenant, 12th Regt., afterwards Lt. Colonel, 12th York Ranger. He lived for some time in Toronto and then moved to Manitoba, where he was an inspector in the N.W. Mounted Police.1 William Dummer Jarvis married Margaret Ranney, daughter of William Parker Ranney.1

Children of William Dummer Jarvis and Margaret Ranney

Citations

  1. [S79] Edward Marion Chadwick, Ontarian Families, Vol. II p. 126.

William Dummer Powell Jarvis1

M, b. 17 December 1821, d. 1900
     William Dummer Powell Jarvis was born on 17 December 1821 in Toronto.1,2 He was the son of Colonel Samuel Peters Jarvis and Mary Boyles Powell.1 William Dummer Powell Jarvis married Diana Irving, daughter of Hon. Jacob Æmilius Irving, on 3 October 1850 in Bonshaw, near Newmarket.1 William Dummer Powell Jarvis died in 1900 (citing a commemorative window plaque in St. James' Cathedral, Toronto.)3

Children of William Dummer Powell Jarvis and Diana Irving

Citations

  1. [S79] Edward Marion Chadwick, Ontarian Families, Vol. II p. 124.
  2. [S456] [J.H. Beers & Co. ], Biographical record of York, p. 211.
  3. [S392] Website findagrave.com (http://www.findagrave.com/) "# 75817329."
  4. [S79] Edward Marion Chadwick, Ontarian Families, Vol. II p. 125.

William Dummer Powell Jarvis1

M, b. 31 March 1892, d. 24 April 1915
     William Dummer Powell Jarvis was born on 31 March 1892 in Toronto, Ontario.1,2 He was the son of Edward Æmilius Jarvis and Elizabeth Margaret Harriet Augusta Irving.1 William Dummer Powell Jarvis died on 24 April 1915 in Belgium at the age of 23 whilst serving as a Lieutenant with C Coy. 3rd Bn. Canadian Infantry (Central Ontario Regiment). He has no known grave, his name appears on the Menin Gate Memorial at Ypres.3

Citations

  1. [S456] [J.H. Beers & Co. ], Biographical record of York, p. 211.
  2. [S392] Website findagrave.com (http://www.findagrave.com/) "# 60731914."
  3. [S49] CWGC.

William George Jarvis1

M, b. 27 January 1871
     William George Jarvis was born on 27 January 1871.1 He was the son of Charles Frederick Jarvis and Mary Ann Graham.1

Citations

  1. [S79] Edward Marion Chadwick, Ontarian Families, Vol. II p. 126.

William Irving Jarvis1

M, b. 26 August 1853, d. 12 February 1907
     William Irving Jarvis was born on 26 August 1853.1 He was the son of William Dummer Powell Jarvis and Diana Irving.1 William Irving Jarvis married Bertha Fowler on 17 March 1893.1 William Irving Jarvis died on 12 February 1907 in Toronto at the age of 53.2

Citations

  1. [S79] Edward Marion Chadwick, Ontarian Families, Vol. II p. 124.
  2. [S232] Ancestry.com, Ontario, Canada Deaths, 1869-1934. York, 1907.

William Reginald Jarvis1

M, b. 14 August 1862
     William Reginald Jarvis was born on 14 August 1862.1 He was the son of William Dummer Jarvis and Margaret Ranney.1

Citations

  1. [S79] Edward Marion Chadwick, Ontarian Families, Vol. II p. 126.

Æmilius Irving Jarvis1

M, b. 16 February 1894, d. 27 December 1961
     Æmilius Irving Jarvis was born on 16 February 1894 in Toronto, Ontario.2 He was the son of Edward Æmilius Jarvis and Elizabeth Margaret Harriet Augusta Irving.1 Æmilius Irving Jarvis died on 27 December 1961 in Toronto, Ontario, at the age of 67.3

Citations

  1. [S79] Edward Marion Chadwick, Ontarian Families, Vol. II p. 125.
  2. [S456] [J.H. Beers & Co. ], Biographical record of York, p. 211.
  3. [S392] Website findagrave.com (http://www.findagrave.com/) "# 60726459."

Sarah Jauncey1

F
     Sarah Jauncey married Henry W. Kingsland.

Child of Sarah Jauncey and Henry W. Kingsland

Citations

  1. [S176] Cuyler Reynolds, Hudson-Mohawk memoirs.

Anna Jay1

F, b. 1849, d. 1925
     Anna Jay was born in 1849.1 She was the daughter of John Jay and Eleanor Kingsland Field.1 Anna Jay married General Hans Lothar de Schwenitz on 12 October 1872 Eight children.1 Anna Jay died in 1925 in Germany.

Citations

  1. [S322] Frederick Clifton Pierce, Field genealogy, p. 384.

Anna Maria Jay1

F, b. 1819
     Anna Maria Jay married Henry Evelyn Pierrepont.1 Anna Maria Jay was born in 1819.1 She was the daughter of Peter Augustus Jay and Mary Rutherford Clarkson.1

Child of Anna Maria Jay and Henry Evelyn Pierrepont

Citations

  1. [S250] Saint Nicholas Society, Vol. 2. p 40.

Augusta Jay1

F, b. 9 August 1844, d. 23 March 1878
     Augusta Jay was born on 9 August 1844.2 She was the daughter of John Jay and Eleanor Kingsland Field.1 Augusta Jay married Edward Randolph Robinson on 3 October 1867 three children.1 Augusta Jay died on 23 March 1878 at the age of 332 and is buried in Saint Matthew's Episcopal Churchyard, Bedford, Westchester County, New York.2

Citations

  1. [S322] Frederick Clifton Pierce, Field genealogy, p. 384.
  2. [S392] Website findagrave.com (http://www.findagrave.com/) "# 21825039."

Augustus Jay1

M, b. 1665, d. 1751
     Augustus Jay was born in 1665.2 He was the son of Pierre Jay.1 Augustus Jay married Ann Maria Bayard, daughter of Balthazar Bayard.1 Augustus Jay died in 1751.2

Child of Augustus Jay and Ann Maria Bayard

Citations

  1. [S18] Various editors, Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans.
  2. [S250] Saint Nicholas Society, Vol. 1. p 86.

Eleanor Jay1

F, b. 16 May 1839, d. 8 June 1921
     Eleanor Jay was born on 16 May 1839.2 She was the daughter of John Jay and Eleanor Kingsland Field.1 Eleanor Jay married Henry Grafton Chapman on 23 June 1859 they had four children.1 Eleanor Jay died on 8 June 1921 at the age of 822 and is buried in Saint Matthew's Episcopal Churchyard, Bedford, Westchester County, New York.2

Citations

  1. [S322] Frederick Clifton Pierce, Field genealogy, p. 384.
  2. [S392] Website findagrave.com (http://www.findagrave.com/) "# 21824691."

Sir James Jay1

M, b. 27 October 1732, d. 20 October 1815
     Sir James Jay was born on 27 October 1732 in New York City.1 He was the son of Peter Jay and Mary Van Cortland.1 He studied medicine, and was associated in 1755 with the Rev. Dr. William Smith, provost of the college, academy and charitable school of Philadelphia in the province of Pennsylvania, in securing the means for the establishment of that college.

While on a visit to England in 1762, Dr. Jay represented the need for higher education in the colonies and presented the claims of, and solicited a considerable sum of money for Kings, afterward Columbia, college, which he helped also to found. He was knighted by King George III. in 1763, and on his return to New York he was instrumental in securing the passage of the New York act of attainder. He published two pamphlets relating to the collections made for the colleges in America (1771-74) and Reflections and Observations on the Gout (1772.) Sir James Jay died on 20 October 1815 in Springfield, New Jersey, at the age of 82.1

Citations

  1. [S18] Various editors, Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans.

John Jay1

M, b. 12 December 1745, d. 17 May 1829
     John Jay. Diplomat and statesman. He was born on 12 December 1745 in New York City.1 He was the son of Peter Jay and Mary Van Cortland.2 In 1755 he was sent to a boarding school at New Rochelle, N.Y., kept by Pastor Stoupe, of the French Huguenot church. He was graduated at King's (Columbia) College, New York City, in 1764; studied law in the office of Benjamin Kissam, and in 1768 was admitted to the bar.

Upon the receipt of the news that the Boston port-bill had passed, Jay became conspicuous as a member of the New York committee of fifty-one to correspond with the other colonies. As a member of the first Continental congress he is credited with being the author of the address prepared by the committee of three appointed by that congress in September, 1774, to the "People of Great Britain," which Jefferson declared to be "a production certainly of the finest pen in America." He was also a member of the second Continental congress which convened in Philadelphia, May 10, 1775, and he drafted the "Address to the people of Canada and of Ireland." As a member of the congress he was appointed a member of the secret committee, Nov. 29, 1775, "to correspond with friends in Great Britain, Ireland and other parts of the world." While attending this congress, his presence was requested by the New York convention, which met in New York city, May 14, 1776; adjourned to White Plains, July 9, 1776, and on Jay's motion that convention unanimously approved of the Declaration of Independence, received from congress on the eve of the adjournment of the convention. The convention, re-assembled at Harlem, was driven successively to Fishkill, Kingston, and finally to Poughkeepsie, and Jay was in daily attendance. On Aug. 1, 1776, he was made chairman of a committee of thirteen to prepare a plan for instituting and framing a form of government, which was ratified, Aug. 26, 1776, but did not receive the action of the committee until the following spring. It was discussed and adopted, April 20, 1777, only a single negative vote being cast, and it was proclaimed by the secretary in front of the court-house at Esopus, N.Y., without being submitted to the people, on account of the disturbed condition of the country. The committee provided a general election, organized a judicial system, and gave to the "Council of Safety" the supreme power to carry on the government in the interim. Jay was appointed chief justice, with Robert R. Livingston as chancellor.

On the withdrawal of Vermont from the jurisdiction of New York, the presence of Jay was demanded in the Continental congress. He was elected by the legislature in October and commissioned by the governor, Nov. 18, 1778, to hold the office till March 3, 1779, and no longer. He took his seat, Dec. 7, 1778, and three days later he was elected president of congress, which position made him chief executive of the confederated states. On Sept. 28, 1779, he was elected by congress minister plenipotentiary to Spain. On his arrival, in 1780, he received no official recognition, as the government of Spain was not disposed to recognize American independence. While in Spain he was added to the commission to negotiate a treaty of peace with Great Britain, and was summoned to Paris to co-operate with Benjamin Franklin, John Adams and Henry Laurens. The position of the commissioners was complicated, as congress, urged by Luzerne, the French minister at Philadelphia, had modified the instructions originally given to the commissioners, and had instructed them "to make the most candid and confidential communications upon all subjects to the ministers of our generous ally, the King of France; to undertake nothing in their negotiations for peace and truce, without their knowledge and concurrence, and ultimately to govern yourselves by their advice and opinion," and on Aug. 6, 1782, matters were further complicated by the presentation of a commission to Jay and Franklin by Richard Oswald,who had already held conversations with Franklin by authority of Lord Shelburne. That commission authorized him to treat with the colonies concerning peace and this developed a difference of opinion between the commissioners. Franklin had hoped to secure the end, while Jay was disinclined to treat unless the new government was recognized. The British cabinet was unfavorable to Jay's view and negotiations were suspended. On hearing of the departure for England of a secret emissary from Vergennes under an assumed name, and after gaining knowledge of the rights to be denied, Jay, without the knowledge of Franklin, prepared a list of considerations for the British ministers, setting forth: 1. That as Britain could not conquer the United States, it was for her interest to conciliate them; 2. That the United States would not treat, except on an equal footing; 3. That it was the interest of France, but not of England, to postpone the acknowledgment of independence to a general peace; 4. That a hope of dividing the fisheries with France would be futile, as America would not make peace without them; 5. That any attempt to deprive the United States of the navigation of the Mississippi or of that river as a boundary would irritate America; and, 6. That such an attempt, if successful, would sow the seeds of war in the very treaty of peace; and he dispatched Benjamin Vaughan to England to counteract Rayneval's adverse influence. Vaughan presented the considerations, and a new commission was drafted authorizing Oswald to treat with the "United States" of America. Vaughan returned with the commission, Sept. 27, 1782, and it was presented to Oswald, Oct. 5, 1782, and this practically closed the treaty.

On his return to New York in July, 1784, Jay found that he had been chosen by congress secretary of foreign affairs, which post he held till the establishment of the Federal government in 1789, when President Washington offered him his choice of the Federal offices in his gift. He accepted that of chief justice of the U.S. supreme court, and took office in the spring of 1790. From 1784 to 1790 he was regent of the University of the State of New York. He was an unsuccessful candidate for governor of New York against George Clinton in 1792. He was sent from Paris as special envoy to Great Britain and signed the treaty of peace known as "Jay's Treaty," Nov. 19, 1794, which was denounced most bitterly by the Jefferson party. During his absence in Great Britain in the spring of 1795, he was elected governor of New York, his opponent being Robert Yates, who was supported by the Clinton party. Washington desired that he should remain in London, and offered him the position of minister resident in place of Pinckney, which offer he declined. He was notified of his election on his arrival in New York, where he was received with demonstrations of enthusiasm, and he resigned his seat as chief justice in the summer of 1795, and assumed the executive office. He was re-elected in April, 1798, and at the close of his second term he refused to accept re-nomination. He also declined the chief-justiceship of the supreme court, to which he had been appointed by President Washington and confirmed by the senate, having decided to retire from public life. The closing quarter of a century of his life was spent at his country seat in Bedford, Westchester county, N.Y. His last office was that of president of the American Bible society. He received the degree of LL.D. from Columbia and from Harvard in 1790; from Brown in 1794, and from the University of Edinburgh in 1792. His name, with thirty-six others, made up the list of "Class M, Rulers and Statesmen." eligible for a place in the Hall of Fame, New York university, and received, in October, 1900, twenty-five votes, standing fifteenth in the class, fifty-one votes being necessary to secure a place. See Life of John Jay, by his son, William Jay (1833), and by Henry B. Renwick (1841), and Life and Times of John Jay, by William Whitelock (1887).2 John Jay married Sarah Van Brugh Livingston, daughter of Governor William Livingston and Susannah French, in 1772.1 John Jay died on 17 May 1829 in Bedford, New York, at the age of 83.1,2

Children of John Jay and Sarah Van Brugh Livingston

Citations

  1. [S44] George Dangerfield, Chancellor Livingston, chart.
  2. [S18] Various editors, Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans.

John Jay1

M, b. 23 June 1817, d. 5 May 1894
     John Jay was born on 23 June 1817 in New York City.1 He was the son of Judge William Jay and Augusta McVickar.1 John Jay married Eleanor Kingsland Field, daughter of Hickson Woolman Field and Eleanor Kingsland de Forrest, in 1837.2 John Jay died on 5 May 1894 in New York City at the age of 76.1

He graduated from Muhlenberg's Institute, Flushing, Long Island, New York, in 1832 and from Columbia College in 1836, and was admitted to the bar in 1839. Like his father he opposed slavery, and he advocated the cause of St. Philip's coloured church, which after nine years of struggle was admitted to the Protestant Episcopal convention. In 1847 he was secretary of the Irish Relief Society and was in that and subsequent years counsel for many fugitive slaves. He organized the meetings held in the Broadway Tabernacle, New York, resulting in the state convention at Saratoga, 10 August 1854, and in the formation of the Republican party upon the dissolution of the Whig party in 1855. He was elected president of the Union League club in 1866 and re-elected in 1877. He was state commissioner for the Federal cemetery at Antietam in 1868 and made a report to Governor R. E. Fenton on the chartered right to burial of the Confederate dead of that campaign. He was U.S. minister to Austria in 1869-75, and advanced the interests of the United States at the World Fair of 1873. He was chairman of the Jay Commission to investigate the system of the New York custom house in 1877, and was Republican member of the state civil service commission in 1883 and subsequently its president. He was manager of the New York Historical Society and a founder and first president of the Huguenot Society in 1855.

Hobart conferred upon him the honorary degree of LL.D. in 1889, and he received the same degree from Columbia in 1891. He is the author of: The Dignity of the Abolition Cause as Compared with the Political Schemes of the Day (1839); Emancipation in the West Indies (1842); Caste and Slavery in the American Church (1843); America, Free or Slave? (1856); Statistics of American Agriculture (1858); The Proxy Bill and Tract Society (1859); Great Conspiracy (1861); Letter on the Monroe Doctrines (1863); Letter to the American Anti-Slavery Society (1864); The Great Issue (1864); and pamphlets on The Church and the Rebellion; Rome in America; The American Foreign Service; The Sunday School a Safeguard to the Republic; The Fisheries Question; The Public School a Portal to the Civil Service; The Passage of the Constitutional Amendment Abolishing Slavery, and other subjects.1

Children of John Jay and Eleanor Kingsland Field

Citations

  1. [S18] Various editors, Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans.
  2. [S322] Frederick Clifton Pierce, Field genealogy, p. 383.
  3. [S322] Frederick Clifton Pierce, Field genealogy, p. 384.

John Clarkson Jay1

M, b. 11 September 1808, d. 15 November 1891
     John Clarkson Jay was born on 11 September 1808 in New York City.1 He was the son of Peter Augustus Jay and Mary Rutherford Clarkson.1 He graduated from Columbia College in 1827, and from the College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1830, and practised medicine.

He was a founder of the Lyceum of Natural History (afterward the New York Academy of Sciences) in 1832; was its treasurer, 1836-43; took an active part in obtaining subscriptions for the new building, and was instrumental in the completion of the work. He was one of the founders, and secretary of the New York Yacht club, and a trustee of Columbia college, 1859-81. Dr. Jay was best known for his work as a conchologist, and his library on the subject, with a rare and valuable collection of shells, was purchased by Catharine S. Wolfe and presented to the American Museum of Natural History as a memorial to her father. Dr. Jay examined, classified and reported on the shells collected by Commodore Perry in his Japan expedition. He is the author of: A Catalogue of Recent Shells (1836), and Description of New and Rare Shells (1836.)1 John Clarkson Jay died on 15 November 1891 in Rye, New York, at the age of 83.1

Citations

  1. [S18] Various editors, Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans.

Mary Jay1

F, b. 1 February 1846, d. 13 January 1916
     Mary Jay was born on 1 February 1846.2 She was the daughter of John Jay and Eleanor Kingsland Field.1 Mary Jay married William Henry Schieffelin on 15 October 1863 five children.1 Mary Jay died on 13 January 1916 at the age of 69.2

Citations

  1. [S322] Frederick Clifton Pierce, Field genealogy, p. 384.
  2. [S392] Website findagrave.com (http://www.findagrave.com/) "# 86583230."

Peter Jay1

M, b. 1704, d. 1782
     Peter Jay was born in 1704.2 He was the son of Augustus Jay and Ann Maria Bayard.1 Peter Jay married Mary Van Cortland, daughter of Jacobus Van Cortland.1 Peter Jay died in 1782.2

Children of Peter Jay and Mary Van Cortland

Citations

  1. [S18] Various editors, Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans.
  2. [S250] Saint Nicholas Society, Vol. 1. p 86.

Peter Augustus Jay1

M, b. 24 January 1776, d. 20 February 1843
     Peter Augustus Jay was born on 24 January 1776 in Elizabethtown, New Jersey.1 He was the son of John Jay and Sarah Van Brugh Livingston.1 He graduated from Columbia in 1794. When his father was sent to Great Britain as special envoy, he accompanied him in the capacity of private secretary, and on his return to New York he studied law, subsequently attaining distinction at the bar. He was a member of the state assembly in 1816, and supported the bill favoring the construction of the Erie canal, also, with his brother William, supporting the bill recommending the abolition of slavery in the state. He was recorder of New York City, 1819-21; was a member of the New York Constitutional Convention in 1821; a trustee of Columbia College, 1812-17, and again, 1823-43, and chairman of the board of trustees in 1832. He was president of the New York Historical Society, 1840-43. He received the degree of A.M. from Yale in 1798, and that of LL.D. from Harvard in 1831 and from Columbia in 1835.1 Peter Augustus Jay married Mary Rutherford Clarkson.1 Peter Augustus Jay died on 20 February 1843 in New York City at the age of 67.1

Children of Peter Augustus Jay and Mary Rutherford Clarkson

Citations

  1. [S18] Various editors, Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans.
  2. [S250] Saint Nicholas Society, Vol. 2. p 40.

Pierre Jay1

M
     Pierre Jay. Who was driven from France in 1685.1

Child of Pierre Jay

Citations

  1. [S18] Various editors, Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans.

Judge William Jay1

M, b. 16 June 1789, d. 17 May 1858
     Judge William Jay was born on 16 June 1789 in New York City.1 He was the son of John Jay and Sarah Van Brugh Livingston.1 He was prepared for college by the Rev. Thomas Ellison and Henry Davis, and graduated from Yale in 1807. He studied law, but on account of a weakness of the eyes he relinquished the profession and retired to his father's home at Bedford, N.Y.

He was brought up in the Protestant Episcopal faith, but his churchmanship was broad, and he gave his co-operation in the formation of the American Bible Society in 1810, against the judgment of the high church party. He was assigned to the bench of Westchester, N.Y., as one of the county judges, by Governor De Witt Clinton in 1818, holding the office until 1823. He was re-appointed under the new constitution in 1823 and served till 1843, when he was displaced by Governor W. C. Bouck at the demand of a proslavery faction, Judge Jay being a conservative anti-slavery advocate, opposed to the work of the Colonization Society. He was first president of the New York Anti-Slavery Society, 1835-36. Kenyon college conferred on him the honorary degree of LL.D. in 1858. He is the author of: Memoir on the Subject of a General Bible Society for the United States (1815); Letter to Bishop Hobart (1823); Mosaic Laws of Servitude (1824); Life of John Jay, with Select Papers (1833); Colonization and Anti-Slavery Societies (1835); A View on the Action of the Federal Government in behalf of Slavery (1837); The Condition of the Free People of Color in the United States (1839); War and Peace (1842); Causes and Consequences of the Mexican War (1849); An Address to the Non-Slave-Holders of the South on the Social and Political Evils of Slavery (1849); Miscellaneous Writings on Slavery (1853), and over thirty published letters, essays and addresses (1815-55). He also left in manuscript A Commentary on the Bible.1 Judge William Jay married Augusta McVickar, daughter of John McVicker, in 1812.1 Judge William Jay died on 17 May 1858 in Bedford, New York, at the age of 68 (also found as 14 October 1858.)1,2

Child of Judge William Jay and Augusta McVickar

Citations

  1. [S18] Various editors, Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans.
  2. [S322] Frederick Clifton Pierce, Field genealogy, p. 384.

Lt. Colonel William Jay1

M, b. 12 February 1841, d. 28 March 1915
     Lt. Colonel William Jay was born on 12 February 1841 in New York City.1 He was the son of John Jay and Eleanor Kingsland Field.1 Lt. Colonel William Jay married Lucy Oelrichs, daughter of Henry Oelrichs and Julia May, on 12 June 1878. They had three children.1 Lt. Colonel William Jay died on 28 March 1915 at the age of 742 and is buried in Saint Matthew's Episcopal Churchyard, Bedford, Westchester County, New York.2

He was prepared for college at the Columbia Grammar School, conducted by Dr. Charles Anthon, and graduated from Columbia College, A.B., 1859.
     In April, 1861, he was appointed volunteer aide-de-camp on the staff of Maj.-Gen. John E. Wool; was commissioned captain in August, 1861, and served as aide-de-camp to Gen. George Morrell; to Gen. George G. Meade, of the 5th corps, Army of the Potomac; to Gen. George Sykes, who succeeded Meade in command of the 5th corps, and again to General Meade after he had assumed command of the Army of the Potomac. He participated in the battles of Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, in the Wilderness campaign, in the siege of Petersburg and in the pursuit of Lee's army, and was present at the surrender at Appomattox. He was twice brevetted for gallant and meritorious conduct. He resigned from the service when the volunteer army was disbanded in 1865, having attained the rank of lieutenant-colonel.
     On returning to New York he was graduated from the Columbia Law School, LL.B., 1867, was admitted to the bar in 1868, and practised in New York city in partnership with Edgar S. Van Winkle and Flamen B. Candler, 1868-82, and after Mr. Van Winkle's death continued the partnership with Mr. Candler. Upon the death of his father, May 5, 1894, he inherited the ancestral estate, Bedford House, at Bedford, Westchester County, New York, which had descended to his great grandfather through Mary Van Cortlandt, her great great grandmother.1

Citations

  1. [S18] Various editors, Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans.
  2. [S392] Website findagrave.com (http://www.findagrave.com/) "# 86602034."

Capt. John Kennon Jayne USNR1

M, b. 4 October 1897, d. 16 July 1957
     Capt. John Kennon Jayne USNR was born on 4 October 1897 in Washington, District of Columbia.2 He married Dorothy Sumner Sewall, daughter of William Dunning Sewall and Mary Loke Sumner, on 20 January 1923.1 Capt. John Kennon Jayne USNR died on 16 July 1957 at the age of 592 and is buried in Arlington National Cemetery, Virginia.2

Child of Capt. John Kennon Jayne USNR and Dorothy Sumner Sewall

Citations

  1. [S160] New York Times, 16 Sep 1945 p. 44.
  2. [S392] Website findagrave.com (http://www.findagrave.com/) "# 49236789."
  3. [S160] New York Times, 24 Oct 1954.

Kennon Jayne1

M, b. 25 March 1926, d. 30 June 2014
     Kennon Jayne was born on 25 March 1926 in New York City.2 He was the son of Capt. John Kennon Jayne USNR and Dorothy Sumner Sewall.1 Kennon Jayne died on 30 June 2014 at the age of 88

Kennon Jayne, age 88, a lifelong resident of New Canaan died Monday, June 30, 2014 in Norwalk Hospital with his loving family by his side. Kennon was born March 25, 1926 in New York City, he was the son of the late John and Dorothy Sewall Jayne. Kennon was the husband of Sabra Toulson Jayne.
As a boy, Kennon attended Fay and Choate School and graduated from Williams College in 1948. In his early adult years Kennon served as a Lieutenant in the US Navy at the end of World War II and during the Korean War as a signal operator. In 1952, he received an honorable discharge and began his civilian life, married Sabra Toulson in 1957 and started his career at IBM as a Marketing Manager. Kennon was a very active member in the New Canaan community volunteering his time and raising funds for the YMCA, United Way Foundation, Waveny Care Center and Staying-Put, to name a few. He was a very active and distinguished member within the St. Marks church community.
In addition to his wife, he is survived by four sons, John T. Jayne and his wife Karen of Littleton, Mass, Truxtun Sewall Jayne and his wife Christina of Seattle, WA, Joseph K. Jayne and his wife Sibyl of Needham, MA and Houston Jayne and his wife Jennifer of Menlo Park, CA, one sister Pamela Miller of Greenwich, CT and six grandchildren, Hannah, Joe, Maxwell, Sam, Madeleine, and Helen. Kennon was predeceased by his son William M. Jayne.
Interment will be held in the family plot in Bath Maine. A Memorial Service will be held at St Marks Church, Oenoke Ridge, New Canaan CT on Saturday, September 13,2014 at 11:00AM. http://www.hoytfuneralhome.com July 2014.3

Child of Kennon Jayne

Citations

  1. [S160] New York Times, 24 Oct 1954.
  2. [S205] Newspaper, New Canaan Daily Voice, 3 July 2014.
  3. [S34] Unverified internet information, http://www.hoytfuneralhome.com