William Hubbard1

M, b. 1597, d. 1670
     William Hubbard was born in 1597 in England.2 He married (unknown) (Unknown) by 1613 in England.2 William Hubbard married Judith (Unknown) before 1635.1,2 William Hubbard died in 1670.2

Child of William Hubbard and (unknown) (Unknown)

Citations

  1. [S75] Frederick Lewis Weis, Colonial Clergy, p. 113.
  2. [S123] Clarence Almon Torrey, New England Marriages Prior to 1700.

Rev. William Hubbard

M, b. circa 1621, d. 14 September 1704
     Rev. William Hubbard was born circa 1621 in England.1 He was the son of William Hubbard and (unknown) (Unknown).2,3 Rev. William Hubbard came to New England in 1635.2 He married Margaret Rogers, daughter of Rev. Nathaniel Rogers and Margaret Crane, by 1647 in Lynn.4,3 Rev. William Hubbard died on 14 September 1704 in Ipswich.2

HUBBARD WILLIAM, was in the first class of graduates at Harvard College, 1642. In the book of "Wonder-working providences" mention is made of William Hubbard, one of the representatives in the general court, from the town of Ipswich. It is said, he was among the most able speakers in the assembly 1637. One gentleman from Salem was allowed to be more fluent, but none more solid and argumentative. This gentleman is supposed to have been father to the subject of this article, who was teacher of the church in Ipswich till his death. The year of his ordination I have never been able to obtain; the records of the church of Ipswich not being preserved. His gravestone is not to be found, and none of the present generation can recollect much about him. The oldest men in the town, who tell of those former divines that were contemporary, such as Rogers, Norton, Cobbet, &c. whose manner of preaching they have heard their fathers describe, have no impressions made upon their minds of the character of Mr. Hubbard, who certainly was for many years the most eminent minister in the county of Essex ; equal to any in the province for learning and candour, and superiour to all his contemporaries as a writer. Perhaps he was not so fervent a preacher as some. He might want a voice and manner, or that animation in the pulpit which some preachers have, and which will be more talked of, than the still sound of wisdom. Or perhaps he lived too long for his reputation. When a man's life is cut short in the midst of his days and usefulness, the excellencies of his name and character are the subjects of remark for many generations. If another continues to old age, and mental imbecilities succeed the more vigorous intellect, he is remembered only in the last stage of life, and he drops into the grave without emotions of sorrow. His name is seldom mentioned in the neighbourhood where he dwelt; but those at a distance, who have heard of his fame when he appeared upon the stage with engaging virtue, or read his works with delight, wish to know what were the more minute parts of his character.
Whether these observations apply generally or not, they certainly apply to the subject of this memoir. He has been quoted by all who give accounts of New-England, but few, very few notices of him are in the records of the town, where he spent his days.
In the year 1676 Mr. Hubbard preached the election sermon, which is among the very good ones published during that century. He was one of the seventeen ministers who bore testimony against the old church in Boston, when they settled Mr. Davenport; also, when the general assembly approved of the act of the first church, and censured the proceedings of the third church, commonly called the Old South. The division excited upon this occasion interested the passions of the people at large, so as to give a new complexion to publick affairs. Most of the deputies, who had so severely censured the brethren who built the Old South church, for their spirit of innovation, and having the good old path of their fathers, were left out, and new members chosen. The town of Ipswich took an active part in this matter; and Mr. Hubbard's influence had considerable effect upon their proceedings.
In 1682, Mr. Hubbard is brought to view as the historian of Massachusetts. He received some reward from the publick for his useful work. The following vote is copied from the records of the general court, October 11. "Whereas it hath been thought necessary and a duty incumbent upon us, to take due notice of all occurrences and passages of God's providence towards the people of this jurisdiction, since their first arrival in these parts, which may remain to posterity, and that the rev. Mr. William Hubbard hath taken pains to compile a history of this nature, which the court doth with thankfulness acknowledge, and as a manifestation thereof, do hereby order the treasurer to pay unto him the sum of fifty pounds in money, he transcribing it fairly into a book, that it may be the more easily perused, in order to the satisfaction of this court."
In 1684 Mr. Hubbard presided at the commencement. This was after the death of president Rogers. But though Dr. Increase Mather was in the neighbourhood, the Senatus Academicus saw fit to send for a minister from the county of Essex; so respectable was his character among the literary men of his profession. The publications of Mr. Hubbard were not very numerous. They consist of several volumes in duodecimo; of which are a narrative of the Indian wars; Memoirs of major gen. Dennison, &c. But his chief attention was paid to his ms. history, which was composed upon the plan of Winthrop's journal. For some reason or other neither of these mss. were permitted to be seen by the publick, till lately the journal has been printed. In all his histories Mr. Hubbard appears a steady friend to the constitution of the churches. He expressed indignant feelings at the erection of the church in Brattle street, upon a more liberal plan than our fathers were willing to adopt. There is nothing of this said in his ms. history, which only comes down to 1680, but he speaks pointedly in his private letters to several gentlemen, and in the last thing he published, his Dying testimony to the order of the churches, which he wrote jointly with Mr. Higginson of Salem. He died Sept. 24th, 1704, aged 83. Eliot: New England Biographical Dictionary, p. 266.5

Child of Rev. William Hubbard and Margaret Rogers

Citations

  1. [S75] Frederick Lewis Weis, Colonial Clergy, p. 112.
  2. [S75] Frederick Lewis Weis, Colonial Clergy, p. 113.
  3. [S123] Clarence Almon Torrey, New England Marriages Prior to 1700.
  4. [S66] Benjamin W. Dwight, Descendants of John Dwight, p. 631.
  5. [S587] John Eliot, New England Biographical Dictionary, p. 266.

William Adrian Hubbard1

M, b. 3 November 1953
     William Adrian Hubbard was born on 3 November 1953 in Catherine Booth Hospital, Pointe Claire, Province of Québec.1 He was the son of Sewell Fortescue Hubbard and Susan Mary Florendine.1 William Adrian Hubbard married Laureen Ann Mallon on 28 May 1988.1

Children of William Adrian Hubbard and Laureen Ann Mallon

Citations

  1. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.

William Alexander Hubbard1

M, b. June 1840, d. September 1913
     Solicitor in Ramsgate, Kent.2 William Alexander Hubbard's birth was registered in the quarter ending June 1840 in the Thanet registration district.3 The marriage of William Alexander Hubbard and Catherine Eliza S.G. St. Aubyn was registered in the quarter ending June 1873 in the Poplar, London registration district.3 William's death was registered in the quarter ending September 1913 in the Thanet registration district.2,3

Child of William Alexander Hubbard and Catherine Eliza S.G. St. Aubyn

Citations

  1. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.
  2. [S117] The Times Newspaper, 11 November 1919.
  3. [S120] Free BMD.

Sgt. Richard Hubbell

M, b. 1617, d. 1699
     Sgt. Richard Hubbell was born in 1617.1 The marriage intention of Sgt. Richard Hubbell and Abigail Prudden, daughter of Rev. Peter Prudden and Joanna Boyse, was published on 16 April 1688 it was his third marriage.1 Sgt. Richard Hubbell died in 1699.1

Citations

  1. [S123] Clarence Almon Torrey, New England Marriages Prior to 1700.

Marie Ursule Hubert1

F
     Marie Ursule Hubert married Hon. John Neilson before 1798.1

Child of Marie Ursule Hubert and Hon. John Neilson

Citations

  1. [S487] Herbert George Todd, Armory and Lineages of Canada, p. 39.

Margaret Hude1

F, d. 16 December 1824
     Margaret Hude married Robert Gilbert Livingston, son of Robert Gilbert Livingston and Catherine McPhaedres, in 1769 or 1770.1 Margaret Hude died on 16 December 1824.1

Citations

  1. [S81] Burke, Landed Gentry, p. 2793.

Hannah Hudson1

F, d. 1646
     Hannah Hudson was the daughter of Ralph Hudson and Mary Thwing.2 Hannah Hudson married Governor Sir John Leverett, son of Thomas Leverett and Anne Fitche, on 18 June 1639? At Boston.1,3 Hannah Hudson died in 1646.4

Child of Hannah Hudson and Governor Sir John Leverett

Citations

  1. [S18] Various editors, Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans, Vol. 6. p. 409.
  2. [S102] Annie Haven Thwing, Inhabitants of the Town of Boston, 2191.
  3. [S123] Clarence Almon Torrey, New England Marriages Prior to 1700.
  4. [S58] Various Editors, Dictionary of Canadian Biography, vol. I. p. 474.

James Hudson1

M
     James Hudson married Mary Rolfe, daughter of Henry Rolfe and Hannah Toppan, on 29 September 1744 in Newbury, Massachusetts.1

Citations

  1. [S269] Fredrick G. Rolfe, The early Rolfe settlers, 1-4.8.

Levi Hudson1

M

Child of Levi Hudson

Citations

  1. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.

Martha Mariah Hudson1

F, b. October 1861, d. 2 February 1944
     Martha Mariah Hudson was born in October 1861 in Kentucky.2 She was the daughter of Levi Hudson.3 Martha Mariah Hudson married Frederick Henry Sewell, son of Frederick George Sewell and Jane Edwards, on 11 February 1880 in Sun City, Kansas.3 Martha Mariah Hudson and Frederick Henry Sewell appear on the census of 8 April 1930 at Great Falls, Montana.4 Martha Mariah Hudson died on 2 February 1944 in Cascade County, Montana, at the age of 825 and is buried in Highland Cemetery, Great Falls, Montana.6

Children of Martha Mariah Hudson and Frederick Henry Sewell

Citations

  1. [S89] Family Search, Michigan Births and Christenings, 1775-1995.
  2. [S208] 1900 US Census, Great Falls, Cascade, Montana; Roll T623_ 910; Page: 48B; Enumeration District: 148.
  3. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.
  4. [S231] 1930 US Census, Great Falls, Montana.
  5. [S232] Ancestry.com, Montana Death Index, 1907-2002.
  6. [S392] Website findagrave.com (http://www.findagrave.com/) "# 52550569."

Ralph Hudson1

M
     Ralph Hudson married Mary Thwing.1

Child of Ralph Hudson and Mary Thwing

Citations

  1. [S102] Annie Haven Thwing, Inhabitants of the Town of Boston, 2191.

George Edward Huff1

M, b. 8 August 1871
     George Edward Huff was born on 8 August 1871 in Napanee, Ontario.2 He was the son of Wesley Huff and Nancy Wales.2 George Edward Huff married Markie E. Grieve, daughter of George Grieve and Mary Rachel Jenkins, in June 1900 in Belleville ?, Hastings County, Ontario.1

Citations

  1. [S232] Ancestry.com, Ontario, Canada Deaths, 1869-1934. Hastings, 1900.
  2. [S232] Ancestry.com, Ontario, Canada Births, 1869-1909. Lennox and Addington, 1871.

Wesley Huff1

M
     Wesley Huff married Nancy Wales.1

Child of Wesley Huff and Nancy Wales

Citations

  1. [S232] Ancestry.com, Ontario, Canada Births, 1869-1909. Lennox and Addington, 1871.

(?) Hugh, Count of Vermandois1

M

Child of (?) Hugh, Count of Vermandois

Citations

  1. [S147] Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Families, p. 193.

Edward George Hugh Earl Grosvenor

M, b. 16 November 1904, d. 13 February 1909
     Edward George Hugh Earl Grosvenor was born on 16 November 1904. He was the son of Richard Arthur Hugh 2nd Duke of Westminster and Constance Edwina Cornwallis-West. Edward George Hugh Earl Grosvenor died on 13 February 1909 at the age of 4.

Henry fitz Hugh1,2

M
     Henry fitz Hugh was the son of Hugh fitz William.1 Henry fitz Hugh is also recorded as Henry de Kilpec he assumed the name Kilpec from the castle of Kilpec, his seat.2 In 1189 as the forester he is represented in the Pipe Roll as owing an arrear of thirteen hawks, which he ought to have furnished the king from the Herefordshire forest of Trivel.3

Child of Henry fitz Hugh

Citations

  1. [S205] Newspaper, Gentleman's Magazine, 1821 (v. 91 pt. 1), p. 411.
  2. [S419] John Corbet Anderson, Shropshire, p. 228.
  3. [S419] John Corbet Anderson, Shropshire, p. 228 citing Rot. Pip. I Ric. 1., p. 142.

Mary Constance Hugh

F, b. 27 June 1910, d. 7 June 2000
     Mary Constance Hugh was born on 27 June 1910 in London. She was the daughter of Richard Arthur Hugh 2nd Duke of Westminster and Constance Edwina Cornwallis-West. Mary Constance Hugh died on 7 June 2000 at the age of 89.

Richard Arthur Hugh 2nd Duke of Westminster

M, b. 19 March 1879, d. 20 July 1953
     Richard Arthur Hugh 2nd Duke of Westminster was born on 19 March 1879. He married first Constance Edwina Cornwallis-West, daughter of Col. William Cornwallis West and Mary Adelaide Virginia Thomasina Eupatoria Fitzpatrick, on 16 February 1901 at St George Hanover Square, London. Richard Arthur Hugh 2nd Duke of Westminster and Constance Edwina Cornwallis-West were divorced in 1919. Richard Arthur Hugh 2nd Duke of Westminster died on 20 July 1953 at the age of 74.

Children of Richard Arthur Hugh 2nd Duke of Westminster and Constance Edwina Cornwallis-West

Ursula Mary Olivia Hugh

F, b. 21 February 1902, d. 5 June 1978
     Ursula Mary Olivia Hugh was born on 21 February 1902. She was the daughter of Richard Arthur Hugh 2nd Duke of Westminster and Constance Edwina Cornwallis-West. Ursula Mary Olivia Hugh died on 5 June 1978 at the age of 76.

Hugh Hughes1

M
     Hugh Hughes was the son of Elizabeth Coytemore.1 Hugh Hughes alias Gwyn.1

Citations

  1. [S14] Henry F. Waters, Genealogical Gleanings in England, p. 160 (Hele, 125).

Aurelia C. Hughson1

F
     Aurelia C. Hughson married Montagu Grant Powell, son of Dr. Robert Henry Wynyard Powell and Elizabeth Fisher Torrance.1

Child of Aurelia C. Hughson and Montagu Grant Powell

Citations

  1. [S232] Ancestry.com, Ontario, Canada Deaths, 1869-1934. Obituary notice in The Brockville Recorder 27 March 2004.

Mary Hulbert1

F
     Mary Hulbert married Roland Cotton.

Child of Mary Hulbert and Roland Cotton

Citations

  1. [S75] Frederick Lewis Weis, Colonial Clergy, p. 62.

Margaret Hulins1

F, d. after 26 March 1661
     Margaret Hulins married Thomas Bliss.1 Margaret Hulins died after 26 March 1661.1

Child of Margaret Hulins and Thomas Bliss

Citations

  1. [S34] Unverified internet information.

Edward Hull1

M, b. before 1635
     Edward Hull was born before 1635.1 He was the son of Robert Hull and Elizabeth (Unknown) widow Storer.1 Edward Hull married Elinor Newman on 20 January 1652/53 in Boston.1,2 Edward Hull was living in Braintree.1

Child of Edward Hull and Elinor Newman

Citations

  1. [S25] Samuel Sewall, Diary of Samuel Sewall (1973 ed.), Vol 2 p. 1090.
  2. [S123] Clarence Almon Torrey, New England Marriages Prior to 1700.

Edward Hull1

M, b. after 1653
     Edward Hull was born after 1653. He was the son of Edward Hull and Elinor Newman.1 Before 1689 he was a a haberdasher in London; Samuel Sewall roomed at the Hat-in-Hand within Aldgate, the house of "Cousin Hull," whilst in England in 1689.1

Citations

  1. [S25] Samuel Sewall, Diary of Samuel Sewall (1973 ed.), Vol 2 p. 1090.

Elizabeth Hull1

F, b. 1652/53, d. 1652/53
     Elizabeth Hull died in 1652/53.1 She was born in 1652/53.1 She was the daughter of John Hull and Judith Quincy.1

Citations

  1. [S102] Annie Haven Thwing, Inhabitants of the Town of Boston, 39422.

Hannah Hull1

F, b. 14 February 1657/58, d. 19 October 1717
     Hannah Hull was born on 14 February 1657/58 in Boston.2,3 She was the daughter of John Hull and Judith Quincy. Hannah Hull married Chief Justice Samuel E. Sewall, son of Rev. Henry Sewall and Jane Dummer, on 28 February 1675/76 in Boston the ceremony was performed by Governor Bradstreet. It is said that she bought a vast dowry of £30,000 in New England silver shillings, being her own weight in silver.1,4,5 Hannah Hull died on 19 October 1717 at the age of 59.6 She was buried on 23 October 1717 "My dear wife is inter'd. Bearers Lt. Gov. Dumer, Maj. Gen. Winthrop; Co. Elisha Hutchinson, Col. Townsend; Andrew Belcher Esq. & Simon Stoddard Esq. I intended Col. Taylor for a Bearer, but his was fro home..... Bror. Gerrish prayd with us when returnd from the Tomb:" His diary cited in Sibley v. 2.7

Children of Hannah Hull and Chief Justice Samuel E. Sewall

Citations

  1. [S3] Nina Moore Tiffany, Samuel E. Sewell: a memoir, p.2.
  2. [S25] Samuel Sewall, Diary of Samuel Sewall (1973 ed.), p. 1076.
  3. [S124] Samuel (Rev.) Sewall, Pedigree of Sewall.
  4. [S25] Samuel Sewall, Diary of Samuel Sewall (1973 ed.), p. 14.
  5. [S123] Clarence Almon Torrey, New England Marriages Prior to 1700.
  6. [S24] Sarah Elizabeth Titcomb, Early New England People, p.218.
  7. [S8] John Langdon Sibley, Biographical Sketches, 1659-1677., p.358.
  8. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.
  9. [S8] John Langdon Sibley, Biographical Sketches, 1659-1677., p.359.

John Hull1

M, b. 18 December 1624, d. 30 September 1683
     John Hull. Silversmith and goldsmith. He was born on 18 December 1624 in Market Harborough, Leicestershire, England.2,3 He was the son of Robert Hull and Elizabeth (Unknown) widow Storer.3 He attended school in England and in 1635 accompanied his parents to New England, arriving in Boston, Nov. 7, 1635. He attended for a short time the first school in Boston, established by Philemon Potmort, April 23, 1635; but was then taken out to help his father plant corn, and he aided him in farm-work for seven years. He then learned the goldsmith's trade. John Hull was chosen corporal under the command of Major Gibbons in 1618, and was made a sergeant in 1652. In that year the general court, in direct defiance of the Mixt Moneys Case decision of 1604 that the Crown of England had the sole right to coin money, ordered a mint to be set up in Boston for the coloring of shillings anti their fractions, every shilling to be 66 2/3 grains of fine silver, and in form flat and square on the edges, stamped on one side with "N. E.," and on the other "XIId." and the fractional coins "VId." and "IIId." The issue for forty years bore the one date "1652," except the "IId."pieces first issued in 1662. On Oct. 19, 1652, it was ordered that, to prevent "clipping or washing," they should have a double ring on either side with the inscription "Massachusetts" and a tree in the centre on the obverse and "New England" and the year on the reverse. John Hull was named for the employment and took his oath of office, June 11, 1652, having Robert Sanderson as a partner in the enterprise. He held the position of mint-master until his death, and received as payment one out of every twenty shillings coined and made a large fortune at that rate, computed at from £30,000 to £40,000. It was also subsequently claimed that the shilling pieces which he coined contained only about 602/3 grains of fine silver, in which case be also made a profit of 6 grains of silver on every shilling coined. In 1686 silver coinage was suspended and colonial bills of credit were issued, the royalists of the colony called the issue the money of treason and claimed that it was made from silver stolen from the Spaniards, that it was dishonest money, that it lowered the royal standard, inflated the colonial currency and that the seigniorage was exorbitant. The contest over the Pine Tree money was more intense when bills of credit were issued. Hull was chosen ensign of the South Military company in 1654, and was selected by the sergeant major and military officers to keep the records of their proceedings in 1656. He was one of the seven selectmen of Boston, 1657-63, and treasurer of the board, 1660-63. He became a member of the artillery company in 1660, afterward known as the Ancient and Honorable artillery; was elected ensign under General Leverett in 1663; lieutenant in 1664; and served as captain, 1671-78. He was deputy for the town of Wenham to the general court in 1668; for the town of Westfield, 1671, 1673 and 1674, for Concord in 1676 and for Salisbury, 1679-80. He was appointed by the council, June 25, 1675, to be one of the war committee and also treasurer-at-war, and served as county treasurer, 1676-79, and as an assistant, 1680-82. He was one of the principal American merchants, if not the greatest of his time, and owned two vessels, which were constantly engaged in voyages to and from the West Indies, England and France, while from year to year he was interested in numerous ventures in beaver, and various other commodities in other ships. He helped to found the Old South church, which was the third church in Boston, 1669. Of his several children, Hannah, who was married to Samuel Sewall, Feb. 28, 1675, was the only one who reached maturity. President Quincy calls John Hull one of the earliest benefactors of Harvard college and a gift of £100 is recorded in 1681.4 John Hull married Judith Quincy, daughter of Edmund Quincy and Judith Pares, on 11 May 1647 in Boston the service was performed by Gov. John Winthrop. She was his step-sister.5,6 John Hull died on 30 September 1683 in Boston, Massachusetts, at the age of 58 (also recorded as 1 Oct 1683).2,4

Children of John Hull and Judith Quincy

Citations

  1. [S3] Nina Moore Tiffany, Samuel E. Sewell: a memoir, p.4.
  2. [S10] Charles G. Steffen, The Sewall children in Colonial New England.
  3. [S18] Various editors, Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans, Vol. 5, p. 519.
  4. [S18] Various editors, Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans, Vol. 5, p. 419.
  5. [S99] Robert Charles Anderson, The Great Migration begins, Quincy.
  6. [S123] Clarence Almon Torrey, New England Marriages Prior to 1700.
  7. [S102] Annie Haven Thwing, Inhabitants of the Town of Boston, 39422.

John Hull1

M, b. 1654, d. 1654
     John Hull died in 1654.1 He was born in 1654.1 He was the son of John Hull and Judith Quincy.1

Citations

  1. [S102] Annie Haven Thwing, Inhabitants of the Town of Boston, 39422.