John Holmes1

M, b. 1664, d. 1713
     John Holmes was born in 1664 in Milton, Massachusetts.1 He was the son of David Holmes and Jane (Unknown).1 John Holmes married Hannah Newell in 1690.1 John Holmes died in 1713 in Woodstock, Connecticut.1

Child of John Holmes and Hannah Newell

Citations

  1. [S38] Catherine Drinker Bowen, Yankee from Olympus, p.6.

Dr. Lathrop Holmes1

M, b. 7 May 1768, d. 1801
     Dr. Lathrop Holmes was born on 7 May 1768.1 He was the son of Captain David Holmes and Temperance Bishop.1 Dr. Lathrop Holmes died in 1801 lost in a shipwreck.1,2

Citations

  1. [S38] Catherine Drinker Bowen, Yankee from Olympus, p.6.
  2. [S38] Catherine Drinker Bowen, Yankee from Olympus, p.18.

Leonard Holmes1

M, b. 17 April 1770
     Leonard Holmes was born on 17 April 1770.1 He was the son of Captain David Holmes and Temperance Bishop.1

Citations

  1. [S38] Catherine Drinker Bowen, Yankee from Olympus, p.6.

Liberty Holmes1

F, b. 3 April 1776
     Liberty Holmes was born on 3 April 1776.1 She was the daughter of Captain David Holmes and Temperance Bishop.1

Citations

  1. [S38] Catherine Drinker Bowen, Yankee from Olympus, p.6.

Margaret Holmes1

F
     Margaret Holmes married Lewis Wood on 29 July 1593 in Nuneaton, Warwickshire.1

Child of Margaret Holmes and Lewis Wood

Citations

  1. [S4] Sandra MacLean Clunies, Clunies files, citing Janet Ireland Delorey, "Origins and Descendants of Edward Wood, of Charlestown," The Genealogist V.9., No.1, Spring 1988.

Mary Jackson Holmes1

F, b. 17 January 1802, d. 14 June 1825
     Mary Jackson Holmes was born on 17 January 1802.1 She was the daughter of Rev. Abiel Holmes and Sarah Wendell.1 Mary Jackson Holmes married Dr. Usher Parsons on 23 September 1822.1 Mary Jackson Holmes died on 14 June 1825 at the age of 23.1

Citations

  1. [S38] Catherine Drinker Bowen, Yankee from Olympus, p.6.

Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes1

M, b. 29 August 1809, d. 7 October 1894
     Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes. The poet. He was born on 29 August 1809 in Cambridge, Massachusetts.2,3 He was the son of Rev. Abiel Holmes and Sarah Wendell.1 He was a descendant of John Holmes, who settled at Woodstock, Conn., in 1686, and of Evert Jansen Wendell, who emigrated from Eraden, East Friesland, Holland, and settled in Albany, N.Y., about 1640. His paternal grandfather was a captain in the British colonial army in the French and Indian war, and later served as a surgeon in the Revolutionary army. His father, a graduate in theology from Yale, and an earnest Calvinist, was pastor for forty years over the First Church, Cambridge. Mass.

The religious training of Oliver's childhood made a deep impression upon his sensitive and poetic nature and from early manhood he was an aggressive Unitarian in direct opposition to the Calvinism of his father. He first attended a "dame school," kept by Mrs. Prenriss, and from his tenth until his fifteenth year he continued his education at a school in Cambridge-port, under Winslow Biglow, where he had as classmates Richard Henry. Dana, Margaret Fuller, and Alfred Lee, afterward bishop of Delaware. From Cambridge he was sent to Phillips academy at Andover, Mass., with the hope that he might incline to the ministry. There he made his first attempt at rhyme in the translation of the first book of Vergil's Æneid? He was graduated from Harvard in 1829 with William H. Channing, Prof. Benjamin Pierce, James Freeman Clarke, the Rev. S. F. Smith, and Benjamin R. Curtis. He roomed in Sloughton ball; was a frequent contributor to college publications; wrote and delivered the poem at commencement, and was one of sixteen of that class whose scholarship admitted them to the Phi Beta Kappa society. His cousin, Wendell Phillips, Charles Sumner and John Lothtop Motley were in attendance at Harvard, although not his classmates. He attended the Dane law school in 1899, remaining one year, and in that year devoted more the to verse writing than he did to Blackstone. In 1830, on reading a newspaper paragraph to the effect that the frigate Constitution was condemned by the navy department to be destroyed, he wrote on the impulse of the moment "Old Ironsides" which appeared first in the Boston Daily Advertiser, and quickly travelled through every newspaper in the United States, saving the vessel from destruction and bringing fame to the author. The following year he studied medicine at a private school under Dr. James Jackson, and in 1833 studied in the hospitals of Paris and London, spending his vacations in travel. He returned to Cambridge in December, 1835, received the M.D. degree from Harvard in 1836, and at once commenced his professional career. The same year he published his first volume of poems, which contained forty-five pieces. He received three of the Boylston prizes for medical dissertations and the three essays were published in 1838. He was professor of anatomy and physiology in Dartmouth college, 1838-40.

He bought a house in Montgomery place, which afterward became Bosworth street, and there his three children were born: His wife died at their Beacon street home in 1888. In 1843 he published an essay on the "Contagiousness of Puerperal Fever," and on this rests his claim to having made an original and valuable discovery for medical science, which called forth at the time a most hostile argument from the two leading American professors of obstetrics, Professors H. L. Hedge and C. D. Meigs, of Philadelphia. He was appointed Parkman professor of anatomy and physiology at Harvard University Medical school in 1847, and occasionally overstepped the strict boundaries of these departments to give instruction in microscopy, psychology and kindred subjects. He relinquished his medical practice and was dean of the medical school, 1847-53. In 1849 he built a house at Pittsfield, Mass., upon the old family place on the road to Lenox, in a township which had belonged to one of his Dutch ancestors in 1735, and there spent his summers until 1856, having as neighbors and associates, Nathaniel Hawthorne, G. P. R. James, Herman Melville, Miss Sedgwick and Fanny Kemble. In 1859 he delivered in several cities a course of lectures on the English Poets of the Nineteenth Century, twelve of which were given before the Lowell Institute. Dr. Holmes was a favorite with the lecture bureaus, and had no lack of engagements; and in his medical lectures at Harvard the last period was assigned to him, because he alone could hold the attentlon of his exhausted audience, listening to the fifth consecutive lecture. As a lecturer he was interesting, original and stimulating. He was wont to speak of occupying not a "chair," but a "settee" of medicine. He invented the arrangement of the stereoscope, afterward universally used, but obtained no patent for an article from which he might have made a fortune, "not caring," as he expressed it, "to be known as the patentee of a pill or of a peeping contrivance."

He was one of the founders of the Atlantic Monthly in 1857, and gave the magazine its name, contributing to it a series of conversational papers entitled The Autocrat of the Breakfast Table (1858), which contained some of his best poems. This was followed by a second series, The Professor at the Breakfast Table (1859), and after a long interval, appeared The Poet at the Breakfast Table (1872). He contributed to the Atlantic the serial novels: Elsie Venner (1861); The Guardian Angel (1867); A Mortal Antipathy (1885); Our Hundred Days in Europe (1887); Over the Teacups (1890). He was identified with the magazine more closely than any other person, and for a longer period. On Dec. 3, 1879, the editors gave a breakfast in his honor, he having passed his seventieth birthday, and Dr. Holmes read the poem The Iron Gate, written for the occasion. He removed from Montgomery place to a house on Charles street, on the riverside, in 1867, and in 1870 to Beacon street, where he lived the rest of his days, making Beverly Farms his summer home. He resigned his professorship at Harvard in 1882, and was immediately made professor emeritus, a rare distinction for Harvard to confer. From that time he lived a retired life in Boston, but continued his writings, "full of the same shrewd sense, wise comment and tender thought" that characterized them from the start. He made a second visit to Europe in 1886, with his daughter, and was everywhere warmly welcomed. He spent most of the time in England and Scotland, where he received the degree of D.C.L. from Oxford university, and that of LL.D. from Edinburgh. He was often called "our poet of occasion," being always ready when called upon to contribute a poem or an essay, giving the best his genius afforded. His writing never wholly weaned him from the medical profession, which he loved strongly because he loved human nature. Besides the works already mentioned, he prepared with Dr. Jacob Bigelow, Marshall Hall's Theory and Practice of Medicine (1839); and is the author of: Lectures on Homoeopathy and its Kindred Delusions (1849); Report on Medical Literature (1848); Currents and Countercurrents in Medical Science (1861); Borderland in some Provinces of Medical Science (1862); Soundings from the Atlantic (1864); Mechanism in Thoughts and Morals (1871); Memoir of John Lothrop Motley (1879); Memoir of Ralph Waldo Emerson (1884); Before the Curfew (1888); poetry: Urania (1846); Astrea (1850); Songs in Many Keys (1861 ); Songs of Many Seasons (1875); The Iron Gate and Other Poems (1880). His poems were subsequently collected into three volumes under the title: The Complete Poetical Works of Oliver Wendell Holmes. See Life and Letters of Oliver Wendell Holmes, by John Torrey Morse, Jr. (1896), and Life of Holmes, by Emma E. Brown (rev. ed., 1895.)4 Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes married Amelia Lee Jackson, daughter of Judge Charles Jackson and Frances Cabot, on 15 June 1840 in King's Chapel, Boston, Massachusetts.2,5 Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes died on 7 October 1894 in 296 Beacon Street, Boston, Massachusetts, at the age of 85.2,3 The burial service, held at King's Chapel, was conducted by the Rev. E.E. Hale and he was buried at Mount Auburn.4

Children of Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes and Amelia Lee Jackson

Citations

  1. [S25] Samuel Sewall, Diary of Samuel Sewall (1973 ed.), Vol. 2. p. 1092.
  2. [S38] Catherine Drinker Bowen, Yankee from Olympus, p.6.
  3. [S18] Various editors, Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans.
  4. [S18] Various editors, Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans, Vol. 5 p. 317.
  5. [S242] L. Vernon Briggs, Genealogy of the Cabot family, p. 267.

Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr.1

M, b. 8 March 1841, d. 6 March 1935
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. (1841-1935)
     Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr.. U.S. Supreme Court Judge. He was born on 8 March 1841 in Boston, Massachusetts.1 He was the son of Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes and Amelia Lee Jackson.1 He was educated in the Boston schools and was graduated at Harvard (class poet) in 1861, while a volunteer soldier in the 4th battalion of infantry at Fort Independence. He was commissioned in the 20th Massachusetts volunteers as lieutenant; and was severely wounded at Bali's Bluff, Va., Oct. 21, 1861; at Antietam, Md., Sept. 17, 1862, and at Marye's Heights, Va., May 3, 1863. He was promoted lieutenant-colonel in 1863, but was not mustered in, as the regiment was too much reduced to permit it. He served as aide-de-camp on the staff of Gen. Horatio G. Wright from Jan. 29, 1864, until he was mustered out, July 17, 1864, with the rank of captain. He was graduated at Harvard law school, 1866, and in 1867 was admitted to the bar and began practice in Boston, Mass. He was instructor in constitutional law at Harvard law school, 1870-71; edited the American Law Review, 1870-73; lectured on common law before the Lowell Institute, 1880; was professor of law at Harvard law school, 1882-83; justice of the supreme court of Massachusetts, 1882-99, and became chief justice in August, 1899. He became a justice of the U.S. Suprelne Court, Dec. 4, 1902. He received the honorary degree of LL.D. from Yale in 1886 and from Harvard in 1895; and was elected a member of the Massachusetts Historical society and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He edited: Kent's Commentaries (12th ed., 1873), and is the author of The Common Law (1881); Speeches (1891, 1896), and various articles contributed to professional journals.2 Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. married Fanny Bowditch Dixwell, daughter of Epes S. Dixwell, on 17 June 1872.1 Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. died on 6 March 1935 at the age of 93.1

Citations

  1. [S38] Catherine Drinker Bowen, Yankee from Olympus, p.6.
  2. [S18] Various editors, Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans, Vol. 5 p. 319.

Rebecca Holmes1

F
     Rebecca Holmes married Thomas Amory.

Child of Rebecca Holmes and Thomas Amory

Citations

  1. [S158] W.H. Whitmore, Payne and Gore Families, p. 20.

Sanford Holmes1

M, b. 11 December 1765
     Sanford Holmes was born on 11 December 1765.1 He was the son of Captain David Holmes and Temperance Bishop.1

Citations

  1. [S38] Catherine Drinker Bowen, Yankee from Olympus, p.6.

Sarah Lathrop Holmes1

F, b. 27 November 1805, d. 6 November 1812
     Sarah Lathrop Holmes was born on 27 November 1805.1 She was the daughter of Rev. Abiel Holmes and Sarah Wendell.1 Sarah Lathrop Holmes died on 6 November 1812 at the age of 6.1

Citations

  1. [S38] Catherine Drinker Bowen, Yankee from Olympus, p.6.

Temperance Holmes1

F, b. 14 June 1774
     Temperance Holmes was born on 14 June 1774.1 She was the daughter of Captain David Holmes and Temperance Bishop.1

Citations

  1. [S38] Catherine Drinker Bowen, Yankee from Olympus, p.6.

Commander Thomas Holmes1

M, b. 1852, d. September 1933
     Commander Thomas Holmes was born in 1852 in Brooke, Norfolk.2 He married firstly Henrietta Louisa Howes in 1883 in Morningthorpe, Norfolk, There were two children of this marriage.3 Commander Thomas Holmes married secondly Agnes Edith Marie Elisabeth Symonds, daughter of Admiral of the Fleet Sir Thomas Matthew Charles Symonds GCB and Prestwood Mary Wolrige, on 15 April 1891 in All Saints', Babbacombe, Torquay, Devon.1 Commander Thomas Holmes and Agnes Edith Marie Elisabeth Symonds appeared in the 1901 census at Chelsea, London. He is noted as a retired commander R.N. and an Inspector of Life Boats.2 Commander Thomas Holmes died in September 1933 in London.4

DEATH OF COMMANDER THOMAS HOLMES
Com. Thomas Holmes, R.N. who has died in London, at the age of 81, spent the greater part of his life in the life boat service. He joined the Navy as a midshipman in 1866 on board H.M.S. Victory, and served as flag-lieutenant to Vice-Adml. Corbett on the East Indies Station.
In 1892 he entered the service of the Royal National Lifeboat Institution. As chief inspector during the years of the war his work and responsibility were very great. Through all difficulties ties the life-boat service carried on, and when peace came could point to a record since August, 1914, of 5,322 lives rescued and 186 boats and vessels saved from destruction. Com. Holmes was awarded the institution's silver medal for gallantry in 1914 for the part he took in the rescue of 12 men when a Norwegian schooner was wrecked off Wexford, and the lifeboat which went to her help was smashed to pieces on the rocks. Western Morning News, September 22, 1933.4

Child of Commander Thomas Holmes and Agnes Edith Marie Elisabeth Symonds

Citations

  1. [S205] Newspaper, The Belfast News-Letter (Belfast, Ireland), Tuesday, April 21, 1891.
  2. [S121] 1901 British Census.
  3. [S606] Findmypast.com, Norfolk Banns Transcription.
  4. [S205] Newspaper, Western Morning News, September 22, 1933.
  5. [S205] Newspaper, Surrey Mirror, December 18, 1914.

Thomas Symonds Holmes1

M, b. 22 May 1892, d. 11 November 1914
     Thomas Symonds Holmes was born on 22 May 1892.2 He was the son of Commander Thomas Holmes and Agnes Edith Marie Elisabeth Symonds.1 Thomas Symonds Holmes was killed in action on 11 November 1914. At the age of 22 Second Lieutenant, Queen's West Surrey Regiment (attached to the Buffs, East Kent Regiment.)1

Citations

  1. [S205] Newspaper, Surrey Mirror, December 18, 1914.
  2. [S232] Ancestry.com, London, England, Births and Baptisms, 1813-1906.

Agnes Holmested1

F
     Agnes Holmested married George Gouinlock.1

Child of Agnes Holmested and George Gouinlock

Citations

  1. [S232] Ancestry.com, Ontario, Canada Marriages, 1857-1924. York 1912.

Conrad Holsinger1

M

Child of Conrad Holsinger

Citations

  1. [S89] Family Search, Wisconsin Marriages, 1836-1930.

Lydia M. Holsinger1

F, b. December 1857
     Lydia M. Holsinger was born in December 1857 in Michigan. She was the daughter of Conrad Holsinger.1 Lydia M. Holsinger married Franklin Parsons Sewall, son of Samuel Moody Sewall and Hannah H. Johnson, on 23 November 1873.1

Children of Lydia M. Holsinger and Franklin Parsons Sewall

Citations

  1. [S89] Family Search, Wisconsin Marriages, 1836-1930.
  2. [S89] Family Search, Wisconsin Deaths and Burials, 1835-1968.
  3. [S89] Family Search, Washington Death Certificates, 1907-1960.

Abner C. Holt1

M, b. February 1826
     Abner C. Holt was born in February 1826 in New Hampshire.2 He married Ann Maria Pollard.3

Child of Abner C. Holt and Ann Maria Pollard

Citations

  1. [S232] Ancestry.com, New Hampshire, Marriage Records Index, 1637-1947.
  2. [S208] 1900 US Census, Concord, Merrimack, New Hampshire.
  3. [S232] Ancestry.com, New Hampshire, Death and Burial Records Index, 1654-1949.

Edmund Holt1

M

Child of Edmund Holt

Citations

  1. [S83] NEHGR, Vol. 6, p. 23.

Ella M. Holt1

F, b. 4 September 1851, d. 9 March 1931
     Ella M. Holt was born on 4 September 1851 in Concord, New Hampshire.2 She was the daughter of Abner C. Holt and Ann Maria Pollard.1,3 Ella M. Holt married Charles H. Sewall, son of Stephen Sewall and Rhoda Ann Hoyt, on 21 October 1875 in Concord, New Hampshire.1 Ella M. Holt died on 9 March 1931 in Concord, New Hampshire, at the age of 79.3

Children of Ella M. Holt and Charles H. Sewall

Citations

  1. [S232] Ancestry.com, New Hampshire, Marriage Records Index, 1637-1947.
  2. [S149] American Ancestors, , New Hampshire: Births to 1901, Deaths and Marriages to 1937.
  3. [S232] Ancestry.com, New Hampshire, Death and Burial Records Index, 1654-1949.
  4. [S89] Family Search, New Hampshire, Marriage Records, 1637-1947.
  5. [S89] Family Search, New Hampshire, Birth Records, Early to 1900.

Katharine Holt1

F, d. 1655
     Katharine Holt was the daughter of Edmund Holt.2 Katharine Holt is also recorded as Katherine Hoult.3 She married Rev. Richard Mather, son of Thomas Mather and Margaret (Unknown), on 29 September 1624 in Bury, Lancashire.4 Katharine Holt died in 1655 in Bury, Lancashire.4

Children of Katharine Holt and Rev. Richard Mather

Citations

  1. [S18] Various editors, Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans.
  2. [S83] NEHGR, Vol. 6, p. 23.
  3. [S20] Various editors, Encyclopaedia Britannica.
  4. [S123] Clarence Almon Torrey, New England Marriages Prior to 1700.

Miriam Holt1

F, b. 23 December 1740, d. 1811
     Miriam Holt was born on 23 December 1740 in York, Maine.2 She married Nicholas Sewall, son of Samuel Sewall and Hannah Kelly, on 1 January 1763.2 Miriam Holt died in 1811 in York, Maine.2

Children of Miriam Holt and Nicholas Sewall

Citations

  1. [S153] Charles Nelson Sinnett, Sinnett's Sewall genealogy, p. 58.
  2. [S365] Eben Graves, The descendants of Henry Sewall. Vol. II (Unpublished), p. 290.

Priscilla Holt1

F
     Priscilla Holt married Nathan Chandler 1st. in 1729.1

Child of Priscilla Holt and Nathan Chandler 1st.

Citations

  1. [S46] Various contributors, Daughters of the American Revolution, Vol. 48 p. 340.

Walter Alfred Holt1

M, b. 28 September 1867, d. 4 August 1936
     Walter Alfred Holt was born on 28 September 1867 in Harrisburg, Oregon.2 He married secondly Frances Elizabeth Warren, daughter of Frank Manley Warren and Anna Sophia Bates Atkinson, on 7 April 1926.1 Walter Alfred Holt lived at 867 Lovejoy Street, Portland, Oregon.2 He died on 4 August 1936 in Portland, Oregon, at the age of 68.3

Citations

  1. [S189] Frederick A. Virkus, Abridged Compendium of American Genealogy, Vol. 5 p. 266.
  2. [S189] Frederick A. Virkus, Abridged Compendium of American Genealogy, Vol. 5 p. 267.
  3. [S392] Website findagrave.com (http://www.findagrave.com/) "# 150716411."

Alfred Hanson Holter1

M, b. 1877
     Alfred Hanson Holter was born in 1877.1 He was the son of Alfred Hanson Penn Holter and Evaline Amanda Apple.1

Citations

  1. [S189] Frederick A. Virkus, Abridged Compendium of American Genealogy, Vol. 4 p. 608.

Alfred Hanson Penn Holter1

M, b. 1847, d. 1906
     Alfred Hanson Penn Holter was born in 1847.1 He married Evaline Amanda Apple, daughter of Wesley Apple and Aseanath Martin Cleveland, in 1877.1 Alfred Hanson Penn Holter died in 1906.1

Children of Alfred Hanson Penn Holter and Evaline Amanda Apple

Citations

  1. [S189] Frederick A. Virkus, Abridged Compendium of American Genealogy, Vol. 4 p. 608.

Aseanath Eloise Holter1

F, b. 1883
     Aseanath Eloise Holter was born in 1883.1 She was the daughter of Alfred Hanson Penn Holter and Evaline Amanda Apple.1

Citations

  1. [S189] Frederick A. Virkus, Abridged Compendium of American Genealogy, Vol. 4 p. 608.

Irma Ann Holter1

F, b. 4 December 1879
     Irma Ann Holter was born on 4 December 1879 in Batavia, Ohio.1 She was the daughter of Alfred Hanson Penn Holter and Evaline Amanda Apple.1 Irma Ann Holter married Dale Kennedy Parrott on 18 March 1900.1

Citations

  1. [S189] Frederick A. Virkus, Abridged Compendium of American Genealogy, Vol. 4 p. 608.

Matilda Holterman

F, b. 1858, d. 1932
     Matilda Holterman was born in 1858. She married John McKnight. Matilda Holterman died in 1932.

Child of Matilda Holterman and John McKnight

Maria Clarkson Holthuysen1

F, b. April 1844, d. 12 October 1903
     Maria Clarkson Holthuysen was born in April 1844 in New York.2 She married Henry Devereux Sewall, son of Henry Foster Sewall and Sarah Allyne Rich, circa 1865.2 Maria Clarkson Holthuysen and Henry Devereux Sewall appear on the census of 1880 at Flushing, Queens, New York, where he is listed as a clerk in the Customs House.3 Maria Clarkson Holthuysen died on 12 October 1903 in Maywood, New Jersey, at the age of 59.1

Child of Maria Clarkson Holthuysen and Henry Devereux Sewall

Citations

  1. [S160] New York Times, 13 October 1903.
  2. [S208] 1900 US Census, NJ BERGEN MIDLAND TWP.
  3. [S107] 1880 US Census.